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    #1

    Position of phrases

    Could forum members please tell me the rules governing the placement of phrases within a sentence

    The following sentences show the phrase THROUGOUT THE COUNTRY placed at various positions:

    A) “The article reported the activities of the revolutionary who was proclaiming, THROGHOUT THE COUNTRY, that it was time to take action”

    B) “The article reported the activities of the revolutionary who was, THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY, proclaiming that it was time…”

    C) “The article reported the activities of the revolutionary who, THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY, was proclaiming that it was time…”

    To my ear, A) sounds the best, but if the phrase comes immediately after the verb PROCLAIMED could it be taken to mean that he was going around shouting the words THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY

    My second choice would be B), but I’m not certain if the phrase should come immediately after the verb WAS

    The least acceptable, according to my sensibilities, would be C) - but is it actually grammatically incorrect?

    I would appreciate the views of any forum member who has the time to consider this issue


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #2

    Re: Position of phrases

    A, and remove the set of commas around the adverb phrase in capitals.

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    #3

    Re: Position of phrases

    Thank you Svartnik for you prompt answer.

    Would you say that the reason for choosing option A) is that it keeps the verb phrase “who was proclaiming” as one unit.

    I noticed that MS WORD grammar checker suggests this. But can you explain why MS WORD highlights such errors on some occasions but not on others:

    1) “She had, consequently, received the first intimations…” HIGHLIGHTED AS A MISTAKE BY MS WORD

    2) “The word ‘no’ is usually printed in Romans…” NOT HIGHLIGHTED

    In both of these sentences, the verb phrase in interrupted by an ADVERB, yet MS WORD seems to consider sentence 1) as inaccurate, but not sentence two. What is the reason for this discrepancy?

    What about the following:

    3) “She had then received… – FLAGGED

    4) “She then had received…” NOT FLAGGED

    To my ear, sentence 3) sounds more natural, yet sentence 4) is preferred by MS WORD.

    Which would you favour?

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    #4

    Re: Position of phrases

    Can any forum member help me with my follow-up query - why is it that a verb phrase can be interupted by an adverb on some occassions but not on others

    Thank you, forum members

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