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      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    gird up the loins of his mind/get into scrapes/for little ocassion/hewers of wood, ..

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “He does not think it worth his while under these circumstances, to "gird up the loins of his mind.”

    gird up the loins of his mind = to prepare himself for hard mental activity

    “They might also engage in pranks, and get into scrapes, as they pleased; but the master would hang up one, impale another, and cut off the ears of a third, for little occasion, or even wholly without it.”

    to get into scrape = make things warm for myself, get myself into trouble

    for little occasion = for trifles, for small matter, for nothingness, for non-essential

    “But it unfortunately happens, that, before he has arrived at that degree of independence, the fate of the individual is too often decided for ever. How are the majority of men trampled in the mire, made "hewers of wood, and drawers of water," long, very long, before there was an opportunity of ascertaining what it was of which they were capable!”

    hewers of wood, and drawers of water = performers of menial tasks

    menial = of or relating to work or a job regarded as servile work pertaining to servants;

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: gird up the loins of his mind/get into scrapes/for little ocassion/hewers of wood

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “He does not think it worth his while under these circumstances, to "gird up the loins of his mind.”

    gird up the loins of his mind = to prepare himself for hard mental activity

    “They might also engage in pranks, and get into scrapes, as they pleased; but the master would hang up one, impale another, and cut off the ears of a third, for little occasion, or even wholly without it.”

    to get into scrape = make things warm for myself, get myself into trouble Yes, but perhaps not so strong as "trouble". Get into mischeif

    for little occasion = for trifles, for small matter, for nothingness, for non-essential

    “But it unfortunately happens, that, before he has arrived at that degree of independence, the fate of the individual is too often decided for ever. How are the majority of men trampled in the mire, made "hewers of wood, and drawers of water," long, very long, before there was an opportunity of ascertaining what it was of which they were capable!”

    hewers of wood, and drawers of water = performers of menial tasks

    menial = of or relating to work or a job regarded as servile work pertaining to servants; "low grade" rather than servile

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    ..

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