Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 1
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    either of those

    Which ones of these sentences are right?
    1.I like both those pictures
    2.I like both of those pictures
    3.I like either of those pictures


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: either of those

    Quote Originally Posted by SORIANA View Post
    Which ones of these sentences are right?
    1.I like both those pictures
    2.I like both of those pictures
    3.I like either of those pictures
    All three are fine.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: either of those

    Quote Originally Posted by soriana View Post
    which ones of these sentences are right?
    1.i like both those pictures (if you put a period at the end)
    2.i like both of those pictures as above
    3.i like either of those pictures this sentence is quite strange; i don't know if any native speaker would say this.
    2006

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 262
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: either of those

    I agree with you 2006. I am not a native speaker but that sentence sounded a bit awkward to me too.

    You can walk on either side of the road. (left or right)
    Either sentence is fine. (You can use sentence #1 or sentence #2)
    Either way you will end up being fooled. (this way or that way)

    I like either of those pictures. (somehow, this doesn't seem to fit in the above pattern)


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: either of those

    Quote Originally Posted by daemon99 View Post
    I agree with you 2006. I am not a native speaker but that sentence sounded a bit awkward to me too.

    You can walk on either side of the road. (left or right)
    Either sentence is fine. (You can use sentence #1 or sentence #2)
    Either way you will end up being fooled. (this way or that way)

    I like either of those pictures. (somehow, this doesn't seem to fit in the above pattern)
    The third sentence is perfectly grammatical.

    "I do not like either of my maths teacher."
    Swan PEU, 174. 2.
    either here means:
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 262
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: either of those

    I do not like either of my maths teacher
    For negative sentences it's fine, I think. It takes the place of any when there are only two things involved.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,125
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: either of those

    Yes, but there is no dichotomy with liking. It is perfectly reasonable to like both pictures. Using "either" presents a false dichotomy. If, for instance, I had been offered one of the two pictures as a gift, and was invited to choose, I might say "I would like either." But, simply asked to give my opinion or judgment about them, I wouldn't say "I like either of the two." In fact it's incongruous with the act of liking.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: either of those

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Yes, but there is no dichotomy with liking. It is perfectly reasonable to like both pictures. Using "either" presents a false dichotomy. If, for instance, I had been offered one of the two pictures as a gift, and was invited to choose, I might say "I would like either." But, simply asked to give my opinion or judgment about them, I wouldn't say "I like either of the two." In fact it's incongruous with the act of liking.
    I do not like either of my maths teacher. Swan (PEU)
    I like either of those pictures.
    either = both
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...4980&dict=CALD

    What is the stickyard here? What makes the first sentence acceptable and not the second? I am pretty sure it is not the positive-negative thingy if there is something at all.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: either of those

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    In fact it's incongruous with the act of liking.
    It is definitely not. I like either picture means I like both of them.

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 18,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: either of those

    In this case, "either" does NOT mean both.

    I agree with the other native speakers here.

    I would like either of those pictures is natural. (If given the choice to have one, I'd be happy with either one.)
    I like both of those pictures is natural
    I do NOT like either of those pictures is natural.
    I like either of the pitures is NOT natural.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •