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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    in blossom/abloom

    Hello,
    I would like to ask how do you, UK native speakers, usually tell that a tree is in blossom. May I also tell that a tree is abloom? And may I use these two words also for flowers and pot plants?

    Thanks,
    Marketa

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in blossom/abloom

    I've never heard 'abloom', though I'd understand it and I wouldn't be surprised if it was hiding in an old* dictionary somewhere! 'In bloom' is fine; or 'blooming'. Flowers bloom, but trees and shrubs are 'in blossom' or 'blossoming'. Often, colloquially, the simple word 'out' is used: Be sure to visit when the azaleas are out.

    b
    *Some dictionaries - OED for example - are published 'on historical principles'. So even a modern edition contains words that are no longer in use.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #3

    Re: in blossom/abloom

    BobK said: Flowers bloom, but trees and shrubs are 'in blossom' or 'blossoming'.

    Shouldn't "in blossom" be "in bloom"?

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    in bloom or in full bloom
    : having flowers ▪ The bushes should be in bloom [=in flower; flowering; blooming] soon. ▪ These plants are very fragrant when they are in full bloom.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in blossom/abloom

    That's an American dictionary; it may have some Br Eng coverage (I don't know). In Br English trees and shrubs have blossom; 'in bloom' is occasionally used more loosely, but it would be very strange to refer to 'apple bloom'.

    b


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #5

    Re: in blossom/abloom

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary[2]
    - The trees have finished blossoming.
    - The trees have finished blooming.
    - The trees have finished flowering.

    Are these all acceptable in British English?

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in blossom/abloom

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary[2]
    - The trees have finished blossoming.
    - The trees have finished blooming.
    - The trees have finished flowering.

    Are these all acceptable in British English?
    I'd expect the second only for trees that have a large, well-formed flower. Often, colloquially, people just use prepositions: "out" = in blossom, "over" = finished: 'The magnolia in my front garden was out for 7/8 weeks, but now it's over.'

    b

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