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    #1

    Word

    She hadn’t wanted the baby and resented his coming, and now that the baby was here, it did not seem possible that he was hers, a part of her.
    I understand the "now that" means since or because, but I don't think it right used here. Right?

    A,' What did you do last night?"
    B," I read a book."
    " I was reading a book."
    Does the first answer mean I have finished the reading while the second answer means I have not finished the reading?

    Please.
    Last edited by puzzle; 13-May-2009 at 15:02.

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    #2

    Re: Word

    Any help?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Word

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    She hadn’t wanted the baby and resented his coming, and now that the baby was here, it did not seem possible that he was hers, a part of her.
    I understand the "now that" means since or because, but I don't think it right used here. Right?

    A,' What did you do last night?"
    B," I read a book."
    " I was reading a book."
    Does the first answer mean I have finished the reading while the second answer means I have not finished the reading?

    Please.
    Hi puzzle,
    1) We use "now" to refer to any point in time in a story. I know it doesn't make a lot of sense, because it was "then" and not "now," but it is used to transition from something that came before to how people felt/what they did afterwards.

    2) No, I would not assume you read the entire book from beginning to end if you said "I read a book." If you said "I read an entire book," that means you read it from start to finish. If you said "I finished my book" that means you had started it at another time and finished it last night. You can even say "I started a new book." But simply "I read a book" means you read some of your book, without implying that you started it, finished, or read a lot or a little.

    Using the continuous isn't quite as common. Use it to show that something else happened while you were reading, or to stress the duration of the activity.

    I was reading a book when Michael called, so I spend the next hour catching up with him. OR I was reading a book the entire night - I forgot to watch American Idol.

    {not a teacher}

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