Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 812
    #1

    Grammar

    A,'Do you know John?'
    B,'Sure. We used to be friends." / "Sure. We have been friends."

    Is the second answer a good sentence?
    If so, does it mean the same with the first answer?

    Please.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    A,'Do you know John?'
    B,'Sure. We used to be friends." / "Sure. We have been friends."

    Is the second answer a good sentence?
    If so, does it mean the same with the first answer?

    Please.
    Correct. Different meaning. used to be suggests not anymore; on the other hand, have been implies a still existing (close) friendship.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #3

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    a,'do you know john?'
    b,'sure. We used to be friends." / "sure. We have been friends."

    Is the second answer a good sentence? no, it isn't and it's not a good response to the question.
    if so, does it mean the same with the first answer?

    Please.
    2006

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 812
    #4

    Re: Grammar

    A,'Do you know John?'
    B,"Sure. We have been friends."

    According to a grammar book, the answer means " we are not friends any more.' Is it possible the book tells wrong?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #5

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    A,'Do you know John?'
    B,"Sure. We have been friends."

    According to a grammar book, the answer means " we are not friends any more.' Is it possible the book tells wrong?
    "We have been friends." is an unnatural awkward inappropriate use of perfect tense. I don't think that native speakers, at least in North America would say that.

    Sure, we used to be friends.
    Sure, we were friends (before)(in the past).

    (and the different meaning) Sure, we are friends.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #6

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Is it possible the book tells wrong?
    Yes, it is.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #7

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    "We have been friends." is an unnatural awkward innapropriate use of perfect tense.
    In your neck of woods, maybe.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #8

    Re: Grammar

    Google -- 130k hits

    "The state present perfect is used with stative verb senses to refer to a state that began in the past and extends to the present, and perhaps will continue in the future." CGEL by Quirk et al.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #9

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    In your neck of woods, maybe.
    svartnik:

    Stop trying to be an English teacher; you are not up to the task. Try being a student instead!

    "used to be" doesn't suggest "not anymore"; it means "not anymore".


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #10

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    svartnik:

    Stop trying to be an English teacher; you are not up to the task. Try being a student instead!
    Is it a sore point with you that you have your Achilles heel too and a student can find it?
    You do not have to be a teacher to be good at English, right? A good book and a pinch of patience will do. It is you who should read upon the use of pp, but more importantly, comply with the forum rules.

    Google -- 130k hits

    "The state present perfect is used with stative verb senses to refer to a state that began in the past and extends to the present, and perhaps will continue in the future." CGEL by Quirk et al.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Grammar Websites and Grammar Chats
    By Grammar Needs Improving in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2009, 19:32
  2. Is there a grammar of spoken English?
    By M56 in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 09-Feb-2009, 01:58
  3. Suggest a name for grammar book
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2008, 08:44
  4. Complex english grammar
    By shivam in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-Oct-2007, 04:57
  5. Complex english grammar
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-May-2007, 08:03

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •