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    #1

    The adjective 'giddy'

    Do You (as native speakers :)) use this word to describe not only the state of feeling dizzy (that is you may faint), but also when you feel nervous and excited about something you've been looking forward to?

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    #2

    Re: The adjective 'giddy'

    Quote Originally Posted by undeddy View Post
    Do You (as native speakers :)) use this word to describe not only the state of feeling dizzy (that is you may faint), but also when you feel nervous and excited about something you've been looking forward to?
    Not unless the nervousness and excitement makes you feel dizzy or disoriented, which is a common symptom of anxiety.
    Giddy, like dizzy, is also used to describe vertigo, which is a definite room-spinning dizziness, as opposed to a "light-headed" dizziness.


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    #3

    Re: The adjective 'giddy'

    If a person is physically feeling dizzy from being spun around quickly, then they might use the word 'giddy' to describe the bodily sensation.

    With other contexts, you shouldn't take this word too literally.
    When we say of someone that, "Within weeks of appearing on Britain's got Talent, this middle-aged spinster from a village in Scotland has been catapulted to the giddy heights of super-celebrity, with the likes of Oprah clamouring to have her on her show."
    Here, we are referring to the experience of feeling disoriented because it's all so new, it's a bit scary, but she probably finds it all tremendously exciting."

    We can also refer to some young girl as being 'giddy', where we mean that the person is excitable and frivolous; not level-headed and sensible, but acting a bit too lighthearted and silly.
    Last edited by David L.; 15-May-2009 at 09:18.

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    #4

    Re: The adjective 'giddy'

    So, besides its direct meaning, 'giddy' can also be used to describe the feeling of excitement, new experience, pleasant worry?


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    #5

    Re: The adjective 'giddy'

    used to describe the feeling of excitement, new experience, pleasant worry?

    Not quite. You are underestimating the cause/, the reason for feeling 'giddy': I might feel excited about my first overseas holiday and a bit worried about travelling in a foreign country, but I'm unlikely to be giddy with excitement.

    It's the excitement caused when so much happens so quickly, all of it new and exciting, that everything starts to feel a bit of a blur, and it's like 'my head is spinning' - it's merely an expression though, not to be taken literally.

    When we refer to someone having attained the 'giddy heights' of some career position or other, the analogy is that they are now so elevated, some mortals might well experience vertigo - dizziness - feel giddy, at such a 'height', compared to the lowly status of most of us.

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