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  1. The Learner's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    Smile Usage of the word Harbor

    Hi all,
    I am little confused with the usage of word 'HARBOR' in the below sentence.

    'the Couple harbored the dream of getting married'

    is it a correct sentence?

    if not kindly explain and tell me the right sentence with the same meaning.

    Thanks in Advance!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
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    #2

    Re: Usage of the word Harbor

    It is perfectly correct:

    harbour (HAVE IN MIND) UK, US harbor
    verb [T]
    to have in mind a thought or feeling, usually over a long period:
    He's been harbouring a grudge against her ever since his promotion was refused.
    There are those who harbour suspicions about his motives.
    Powell remains non-committal about any political ambitions he may harbour.

    [Cambridge Dictionary]

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