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    #1

    Need to be

    Please explain this:

    1) He needs to be more hardworking and work hard in his studies.
    [ Is this sentence formed by two things in which
    ' He needs to be more hardworking' and
    ' He needs to work hard'?

    2) Can I say, ' He needs to be more hardworking and to work hard in his studies '? Explain.

    3) Give me more examples of 'infinitive without to' . Explain how it should be used.

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: Need to be

    Yes, it means those two things. It''s not an infinitive without 'to' here- the to comes after 'comes' and the writer has simply not repeated it, though I think the sentence would be better the way you have it with 'to' repeated because you have hardworking (adjective) and work hard (verb + adverb) next to each other- 'to' separates them better.

    However, even then it is an ugly sentence IMO because it is repetitive- the second half doesn't add anything in particular so I can't see the point in having hard/work repeated close together.

    3 Example- We use infinitives without 'to' after modal verbs.

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    #3

    Re: Need to be

    Yes, it means those two things. It''s not an infinitive without 'to' here- the to comes after 'comes' and the writer has simply not repeated it, though I think the sentence would be better the way you have it with 'to' repeated because you have hardworking (adjective) and work hard (verb + adverb) next to each other- 'to' separates them better.

    However, even then it is an ugly sentence IMO because it is repetitive- the second half doesn't add anything in particular so I can't see the point in having hard/work repeated close together.

    3 Example- We use infinitives without 'to' after modal verbs.

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    #4

    Re: Need to be

    3 Example- We use infinitives without 'to' after modal verbs.[/QUOTE]

    What are ' modal verbs'?
    Can you give me more examples of this. Give me few examples of sentence to illustrate it.

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    #5

    Re: Need to be


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