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    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 85
    #1

    to

    It is used to give a helping hand to the poor and help them to maintain their lives.

    Should I add "to" before "help?"

    Thank you.

  1. Dany's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2004
    • Posts: 602
    #2

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by bread
    It is used to give a helping hand to the poor and help them to maintain their lives.

    Should I add "to" before "help?"

    Thank you.
    Hello bread,

    No, you shouldn't add "to" befor "help".
    It's the same like "I help you". You also don't say "I to help you"

    Kind regards,
    Dany

  2. Dany's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2004
    • Posts: 602
    #3

    Re: to

    Sorry, please don't notice my first massage. I got a mistake in my mind (is that correct?)

    But you really don't add "to" befor "help". Only my example was wrong

    You don't have to add "to" because "and to help" doesn't work in that case.
    Example:
    They spend money to help victims of the disaster in Asia.
    They spend money and help victims with the appropriation of clean water.

    Kind regards,
    Dany


    • Join Date: Mar 2004
    • Posts: 85
    #4

    Re: to

    Thanks Dany.

    Actually, I just wonder if not adding "to" before help would confuse the readers. If I don't so, would they take the sentence as " It is used to give a helping hand to the poor and it helps them to maintain their lives."

    Thanks!

    • Member Info
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      • British English
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      • UK
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #5

    Re: to

    You can use it with or without 'to'.

  3. Dany's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2004
    • Posts: 602
    #6

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    You can use it with or without 'to'.
    Really? With "to" it doesn't sound good to me

  4. Dany's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2004
    • Posts: 602
    #7

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    You can use it with or without 'to'.
    Really? With "to" it doesn't sound good to me

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #8

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by Dany
    Really? With "to" it doesn't sound good to me
    EX: It is used to give a helping hand to the poor and help them to maintain their lives.


    The grammar point has to do with the conjunction "and":

    . . . to give the poor and to help the poor. . .

    Notice that "and" joins two like units.

    As tdol points out, "to" is optional in that context:

    . . . to give the poor and help the poor. . .

    The first "to" covers both units.

  6. Dany's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2004
    • Posts: 602
    #9

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea

    . . . to give the poor and help the poor. . .

    The first "to" covers both units.
    That's why I was sure, that the second "to" after "and" doesn't work.
    Even after your explanation it sounds odd to me. But it doesn't matter,
    because it is not wrong when I don't use "to"

    Thanks a lot for your explanation

    Kind regards,
    Dany

  7. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #10

    Re: to

    Quote Originally Posted by Dany
    Even after your explanation it sounds odd to me. But it doesn't matter, because it is not wrong when I don't use "to"

    Thanks a lot for your explanation
    But. . . Dany, the following two sentence are Standard English:

    EX: It is used to give a helping hand to the poor and to help them to maintain their lives

    EX: It is used to help them to maintain their lives.

    I gather you were focused on the prepositional phrase 'to the poor' and the to-infintive phrase to help', right? You're right about the first 'to'. It's a preposition, whereas the second 'to' is not. It's the to-infintive, but that infintive is not conjoined with 'to the poor'. On the contrary, the conjunction "and" joins it with 'to give', so, and as tdol pointed out, with or without 'to' is possible:

    It is used to give. . .and to help. . . .
    It is used to give. . .and help. . . .

    You're right about it not being wrong if you don't use it, but, you see, other speaker do in fact use it. It's Standard English.

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