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    #1

    Smile which one is correct?

    When I saw gossip girl, chuck asked a girl "Have you seen Blair?"
    But when I saw another film, teddy bear said to little bird " Did you see my glove?"

    Both of these two questions are inquire where is that person or that goods. But I was confused
    "Have you seen Diana?" Or "Did you see Diana? won't they mean the same? If not, which one is correct or any different between these two?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Smile Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diana doll View Post
    When I saw gossip girl, chuck asked a girl "Have you seen Blair?"
    But when I saw another film, teddy bear said to little bird " Did you see my glove?"

    Both of these two questions are inquire where is that person or that goods. But I was confused
    "Have you seen Diana?" Or "Did you see Diana? won't they mean the same? If not, which one is correct or any different between these two?

    Thank you.
    Essentially, they both mean the same thing, although the present perct (Have you seen Diana? Have you seen my glove?") is the grammatically correct version.
    In American English, past simple is often used instead of present perfect.


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    #3

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaykaylam View Post
    Essentially, they both mean the same thing, although the present perct (Have you seen Diana? Have you seen my glove?") is the grammatically correct version.
    In American English, past simple is often used instead of present perfect.
    Dear Jakaylam, thanks a lot!!! It's very clearly, I got it!! Have a nice day

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    #4

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaykaylam View Post
    essentially, they both mean the same thing, although the present perct (have you seen diana? Have you seen my glove?") is the grammatically correct version. who decided that??
    in american english, past simple is often used instead of present perfect.
    2006


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    #5

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    2006
    Hi, 2006, you have different idea???

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Diana doll View Post
    Hi, 2006, you have different idea???
    Yes he does.
    Most British, Australian, NZ, Indian, South African ... English speakers, and perhaps some Americans too, would tell you that, traditionally, the present perfect is the correct tense to use here (and it is in those countries).
    North Americans sometimes use the simple past tense here, so some are especially sensitive to claims that the present perfect is the "grammatically correct" tense.

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    #7

    Re: which one is correct?

    You were looking through those boxes in the garage? Did you see my glove?

    I heard you were in London last month. Did you see Diana?

    Context is everything. More than one thing can be correct depending on the context.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    You were looking through those boxes in the garage? Did you see my glove?

    I heard you were in London last month. Did you see Diana?

    Context is everything. More than one thing can be correct depending on the context.
    Yes, but in this case, context is not the point. The issue is a real distinction between the use of the two tenses. Some North Americans use the simple past tense in the same contexts for which most other English speakers use the present perfect.
    For example.
    Did you have breakfast yet? Did you see my gloves? I can't find them. - Some North Americans.
    Have you had breakfast yet? Have your seen my gloves? I can't find them. - Most other English speakers, in the same context.

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    #9

    Re: which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The issue is a real distinction between the use of the two tenses. Some North Americans use the simple past tense in the same contexts for which most other English speakers use the present perfect.
    But does that mean that only one group can be correct?
    For example.
    Did you have breakfast yet? Did you see my gloves? I can't find them. - Some North Americans. North Americans use both tenses under discussion. They don't insist that only one tense is correct.

    If a sentence such as like "Did you see my glove?" violates no rule of English grammar and has meaning, with or without context, how can one say that sentence is not correct.
    My opinion is that saying a sentence like "Did you see my glove?' is not correct is a disservice to students. If one wants to say that the present perfect form is strongly preferred in some countries, one can of course say that. But it would be very helpful to say why the simple past form is not used.
    And if the simple past form is considered to be just wrong, again the reason for this should be given.

    (My comments are not only directed at Raymott.)

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: which one is correct?

    [quote=2006;480593]
    The issue is a real distinction between the use of the two tenses. Some North Americans use the simple past tense in the same contexts for which most other English speakers use the present perfect.
    But does that mean that only one group can be correct?

    No, but it does mean that one cannot resolve the issue by appealing to context - which was the essence of my reply to Barb's post.



    For example.
    Did you have breakfast yet? Did you see my gloves? I can't find them. - Some North Americans. North Americans use both tenses under discussion. They don't insist that only one tense is correct.

    Hence my use of the qualifying "Some". Perhaps instead of "Some Americans use it", I should have said "Some Americans use it some of the time", and most non-Americans use the present perfect "almost all of the time".

    If a sentence such as like "Did you see my glove?" violates no rule of English grammar and has meaning, with or without context, how can one say that sentence is not correct.

    I'm not the one who is saying it's incorrect. All I'm saying is that it's American. Others can draw their own conclusions from that.


    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    My opinion is that saying a sentence like "Did you see my glove?' is not correct is a disservice to students. If one wants to say that the present perfect form is strongly preferred in some countries, one can of course say that. But it would be very helpful to say why the simple past form is not used.

    I don't know why the simple past form is not used outside parts of America. I've always assumed that most of the English-speaking world uses the present perfect because that is the traditional tense to use in this situation. It is one Americanism that just hasn't caught on.
    I'm not even sure that this is standard AmE.

    And if the simple past form is considered to be just wrong, again the reason for this should be given.

    And that would be a task for those who are arguing that it is wrong. I am content merely to point out to learners that the present perfect is correct - since it is. If a minority dialect has a different usage that they are championing, those interested can make that point.


    Besides that, you can probably tell that I don't much like the sound of the simple past in this context, and I have no interest in propagating it. But I do concede that Americans should be allowed to express themselves as they please. And I have pointed out on this forum in the past that Americans do tend to use this form at times.

    R.

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