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  1. karateka_girls's Avatar

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    #1

    (again) causative..

    eg: S+Have+ Person+Base form of Verb +object
    i had my sister cook the dinner.


    can i say : i have my sister cook the dinner instead of i had my sister cook the dinner. (i have this thought since i read my grammar book)

    thanks for the answer...

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Smile Re: (again) causative..

    Quote Originally Posted by karateka_girls View Post
    eg: S+Have+ Person+Base form of Verb +object
    i had my sister cook the dinner.


    can i say : i have my sister cook the dinner instead of i had my sister cook the dinner. (i have this thought since i read my grammar book)

    thanks for the answer...
    I had my sister cook the dinner (yesterday/on Wednesday, etc).
    Your sister cooked the dinner because you made her do so.

    I have my sister cook dinner (every day/on Wednesdays, etc).
    Your sister cooks dinner (every day/on Wednesdays) because you make her do so.


  3. karateka_girls's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: (again) causative..

    thanks for the answer Engee30


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #4

    Re: (again) causative..

    I had my sister cook the dinner (yesterday/on Wednesday, etc).
    Your sister cooked the dinner because you made her do so.

    I have my sister cook dinner (every day/on Wednesdays, etc).
    Your sister cooks dinner (every day/on Wednesdays) because you make her do so.
    Not to nitpick, but just to put a clarifying spin on Engee30's correct response...

    Karateka_girls, just be aware that the phrase to have sb do st is often not exactly the same as the phrase to make sb do st. Causative make is usually stronger than causative have. Using make implies greater force on the part of the subject, and perhaps greater reluctance on the part of the person performing the action. If you have sb do st, maybe all you have to do is ask them or let them know what needs to be done. For example:

    I made my cousin fix my computer.
    (He used it without permission, and really messed it up. I'm angry about it, and I told him if he didn't fix it I'd never let him in my house again!)

    I had my friend fix my computer.
    (He's great with computers, and so I asked him if he would take a look at it for me. He agreed, and he fixed it for me. I didn't have to force him to fix it; he was perfectly willing to do it.)

    It is true, however, that using causative have can sometimes mask or understate the amount of force used or the degree of reluctance on the part of the person who performs the action. For example:

    Mrs. Steele had Johnny return the apple he stole from Susan's lunchbox.
    (It's probably safe to say that Johnny was not exactly willing to do that, but one strongly worded statement from the teacher was all it took. He knew he had no choice but to obey. The writer is downplaying or understating the amount of force the teacher used. Causitive make could also be used with no substantive change in the meaning.)

    Greg


  4. engee30's Avatar
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    #5

    Thumbs up Re: (again) causative..

    I reckon, on the whole, have someone do something is softer than make someone do something.

  5. karateka_girls's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: (again) causative..

    so far...i understand the explanation , but what make me confused is that can i change ... e.g. had into have, because all the sentences (causative) that i've read are all in past form. so can i change it? does it give any effect?

  6. engee30's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: (again) causative..

    Quote Originally Posted by karateka_girls View Post
    so far...i understand the explanation , but what make me confused is that can i change ... e.g. had into have, because all the sentences (causative) that i've read are all in past form. so can i change it? does it give any effect?
    You can change it; however, by doing so, you will be talking about things that you want someone else to do in present time. Had is for the past; have/has for the present; will have for the future.

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