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    #1

    loophole

    Dear teachers,

    I know the meaning of the term “loophole” namely “back small door” or “a way of escaping a difficulty, especially an omission or ambiguity in the wording of a contract or law that provides a means of evading compliance.” I know also such connotations as “to close a loophole in the law”. “to fix a loophole in the law”, “to find a legal loophole in law” or “to find a tax loophole”.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether there is a connotation “to find a loophole” concerning the term “stitch” – “take up a stitch” (“pick up a stitch”)?

    Do you know the idiom “to put on quite a show”? Would you tell me whether it is interconnected with the term in question.

    What do you mean about the phrase “Knit one, purl one”?

    What do you mean about the other meaning of the term in question?

    loophole (n) = a small hole or slit in a wall, especially one through which small arms may be fired

    to find a loophole (to find an embrasure)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 26-May-2009 at 16:16.

  1. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #2

    Re: loophole

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether there is a connotation “to find a loophole” concerning the term “stitch” – “take up a stitch” (“pick up a stitch”)?
    I cannot think of any expression involving the word "stitch" that has even a remote connection to the idea of the idiomatic meaning of "loophole". To me, "pick up a stitch" is literally something that happens when you are knitting (and in my particular case, picking up a stitch is often quite unintentional -- I don't knit very well).

    Do you know the idiom “to put on quite a show”?
    Yes
    Would you tell me whether it is interconnected with the term in question.
    No, it has no connection whatsoever with finding a loophole.

    What do you know about the phrase “Knit one, purl one”?
    That is something connected with the activity called knitting. For me, it is quite literal. It simply refers to making one stitch a "knit" stitch and the next a "purl" stitch.

    What do you know about the other meaning of the term in question?

    loophole (n) = a small hole or slit in a wall, especially one through which small arms may be fired
    That is simply another meaning for the word "loophole".

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    #3

    Re: loophole

    Knit one, purl one, is a knitting expression. The "knit stitch" looks like a "purl" stitch on the reverse of the item. And, vice versa.

    As for "Pick up a stitch" in means to make an extra stitch in a row. You are increasing the width of the piece being knitted.

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    #4

    Re: loophole

    Hi teachers,

    Thank you for your help.

    The following brief excerpts from a bilingual dictionary state my grounds concerning my longwided questions in my original post above.

    to close a loophole ein Schlupfloch stopfen [fig.] to close a loophole eine Lücke schließen to find a loophole eine Masche finden to fix a loophole

    Masche {f} [Strickmasche, Häkelmasche]
    stitch

    eine Masche finden
    to find a loophole

    Eine Masche rechts, eine links stricken.
    textil. Knit one, purl one.

    eine Masche abziehen
    idiom to put on a show

    Regards,

    V.

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