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    #1

    I'm suffering from dysentery."

    My dear and respected teachers

    1: "I'm suffering from dysentery." correct?

    2: I often see people say in the chat room "What's good?" Is it a greeting? if so what should I say in reply?

    3: "I'm fine with your prays." correct?

    4: "What are you up to?" what does it mean? and what should I say in reply?

    Thanks in advance!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: I'm suffering from dysentery."

    Quote Originally Posted by twilit1988 View Post
    My dear and respected teachers

    1: "I'm suffering from dysentery." correct?

    2: I often see people say in the chat room "What's good?" Is it a greeting? if so what should I say in reply? It's shorthand for How are you doing?

    3: "I'm fine with your prayers." correct?

    4: "What are you up to?" what does it mean? and what should I say in reply? Again, "How are you?", "How are things with you?". An equally non-committal and general reply is all that is needed: "I'm fine", I'm doing well", "Things are great" etc.

    Thanks in advance!
    ..


    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 182
    #3

    Re: I'm suffering from dysentery."

    1. It would be correct grammar, but depending on the context, it might not be an appropriate topic for discussion. Or it might just be more information than someone would want to know. You would probably start by saying, "I haven't been feeling well lately" or "I've been sick". If they ask for further information, then you might tell them that you have dysentery.

    2. It could be used as a greeting, I suppose. Usually I see the phrase used to ask for a recommendation. If there is a topic you are discussing (books, movies, restaurants, food or whatever), someone may ask "What's good?" Then you would tell them what (books movies, restaurants, food or whatever) you like that they might want to try. If there's no obvious topic being discussed, perhaps it is being used as a conversation filler. In that case it means more like "What's going on?" (from someone who just entered the chatroom) or "What shall we talk about now?" You might respond by welcoming them to the conversation, mentioning something you like or introducing a conversation starter. I don't spend a lot of time in chat rooms, so I could be wrong on this one.

    3. If someone offers to pray for you, you can say, "I appreciate your prayers." If they know you follow a different religion and are asking whether it is okay for them to pray under their religion, then you might say "I'm fine with your prayers."

    4. "What are you up to?" can mean "What is going on in your life?" or "What are you doing right now?" If you are in the middle of doing something, tell them about that. Otherwise, tell them something interesting that you have done recently or are planning to do that they might not know about already. If there's nothing new or interesting that you're involved with, you could say, "Oh, the usual" or "Not much, just..."

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I'm suffering from dysentery."

    Quote Originally Posted by twilit1988 View Post
    My dear and respected teachers

    1: "I'm suffering from dysentery." correct?
    Dysentery is a commonly misused word. The symptom is diarrhea (or diarrhoea if you're British). Dysentery is an infectious disease, whereas diarrhea can also occur from non-infectious causes such as irritable bowel syndrome, cancer, Crohn's disease, radiation poisoning ....
    Of course, if you have dysentery, you are correct.

    Dysentery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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