Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Volcano1985's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 928
    #1

    Looking For A Proverb

    I know a proverb which is : "Let the snake that doesn't touch me live long."

    Which means if someone is doing a bad thing, and if it doesn't damage me, I don't care it.

    Is there similar one in English?


    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 8
    #2

    Re: Looking For A Proverb

    I couldn't think of an equivalent English proverb, so I checked a long list of proverbs and still didn't find a match. Based on a quick review, it seems that most English proverbs focus on personal responsibility, and either give advice for living responsibly or emphasize of the consequences of imprudent actions.
    However, English has a verb, "to turn a blind eye," which means to refuse to acknowledge. In common use, turning a blind eye is generally used in reference to unlawful, immoral, or unjust actions. The Obama administration is no longer allowing politicians to turn a blind eye to injustices perpetrated in the name of freedom. That verb is the closest example of English that I could find to your proverb.

  2. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    #3

    Re: Looking For A Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Volcano1985 View Post
    I know a proverb which is : "Let the snake that doesn't touch me live long."

    Which means if someone is doing a bad thing, and if it doesn't damage me, I don't care it.

    Is there similar one in English?
    Hi Volcano1985,

    "See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" comes very close. Originally a pictorial maxim, this phrase comes to English from the original Japanese: , san'en or sanzaru, or , sanbiki no saru, and means literally "three monkeys."

    The original meaning of this Japanses maxim differs from the meaning associated with it in the contemporary English-speaking world (please see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_wise_monkeys for more on this original meaning). Today, as the wiki article points out:
    "See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" is commonly used to describe someone who doesn't want to be involved in a situation, or someone willfully turning a blind eye to the immorality of an act in which they are involved.
    Last edited by Monticello; 03-Jun-2009 at 05:14.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #4

    Re: Looking For A Proverb

    How about "Let sleeping dogs lie."

Similar Threads

  1. explaining proverb
    By blouen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 29-Aug-2007, 23:16
  2. school proverb
    By blouen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 28-Aug-2007, 22:35
  3. proverb
    By ttt in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Dec-2006, 13:07
  4. axiom vs proverb
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2003, 21:45

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •