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    • Join Date: Jun 2009
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    #1

    Verb use

    If you apply for the job, you'll get it.
    If you applied for the job, you'd get it.


    Is this future tense and past tense?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: Verb use

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbijoe View Post
    If you apply for the job, you'll get it.
    If you applied for the job, you'd get it.


    Is this future tense and past tense?

    If you apply for the job, you will get it. This is first conditional.


    If you applied for the job, you would get it. This is second conditional.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #3

    Re: Verb use

    conditionals - definitions - grammar - central - British Council - LearnEnglish

    Conditionals

    What is meant by the 'first', 'second' and 'third' conditionals?



    first conditional
    This refers to a grammar structure used to talk about the ‘likely’ result of something happening or not happening. The grammar structure is:
    if-clause: 'if' + present tense (eats)
    main clause: will or won't
    If he takes these antibiotics, he’ll get better quickly. If he doesn’t, he won’t.
    Note! Certain other modal verbs (for example, might, but not would), can be used in the main clause.


    second conditional
    This refers to a grammar structure used to talk about an ‘unreal’ or ‘unlikely’ situation. The grammar structure is:
    If-clause: 'if' + past tense (ate)
    Main clause: 'would' or 'wouldn't'
    If my shares went up 500% I’d sell them instantly. (but it’s unlikely that they will go up 500%)
    Note! Could and might can also be used in the main clause.


    third conditional
    This refers to a grammar structure used to imagine the impossible. It is impossible because something happened in the past and can’t be changed. The grammar structure is:
    If-clause: 'if' + past perfect (had eaten)
    Main clause: would have + past participle (eaten)
    You would have passed your exam if you had studied harder. (but you didn’t study hard and you didn't pass your exam)
    Note! Could have and might have can also be used in the main clause.

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