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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    please help me

    first question:
    I have not been there before,how about you?
    me ( )
    either or neither?
    please tll me why?

    second question:
    what's th derference between drop and fall.
    when I want to express " snowflake fall/drop to the earth from sky", how to say it, used drop or fall?
    Last edited by c.c; 05-Jun-2009 at 11:40.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #2

    Re: please help me

    A: I have not been there before. How about you?
    B: Me neither. / Me either.

    Learn about the phrases "Me either" and "Me neither" here:
    http://tinyurl.com/pefeg8


    neither
    adv.
    1 used to show that a negative statement is also true of sb/sth else: He didnít remember and neither did I. I hadnít been to New York before and neither had Jane. ĎI canít understand a word of it.í ĎNeither can I (informal) ĎI donít know.í ĎMe neither

    either
    adv.
    1 used after negative phrases to state that a feeling or situation is similar to one already mentioned: Pete canít go and I canít either. (NAmE, informal) ĎI donít like it.í ĎMe either.í (= Neither do I).

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: please help me

    thanks.
    but, but I can't understand which one is correct?
    Is the both incorrect?


    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    A: I have not been there before. How about you?
    B: Me neither. / Me either.

    Learn about the phrases "Me either" and "Me neither" here:
    http://tinyurl.com/pefeg8


    neither
    adv.
    1 used to show that a negative statement is also true of sb/sth else: He didnít remember and neither did I. I hadnít been to New York before and neither had Jane. ĎI canít understand a word of it.í ĎNeither can I (informal) ĎI donít know.í ĎMe neither

    either
    adv.
    1 used after negative phrases to state that a feeling or situation is similar to one already mentioned: Pete canít go and I canít either. (NAmE, informal) ĎI donít like it.í ĎMe either.í (= Neither do I).


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #4

    Re: please help me

    In informal speech, they're both correct.
    In formal speech I would say "I haven't, either. / Neither have I."

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