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    #1

    "you guys"

    While conducting a class, is it OK to say "you guys" to the participants to make the atmosphere less offical & relaxed ? If not, any expression to replace "you all" for public speaking in a friendly/warm manner?

    Tks /ju

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "you guys"

    You can say you guys, but only if everyone is about your age and it feels fraternal. You folks is a good alternative which is less informal, and perhaps acceptable with all audiences. You guys is distinctly American, however, and although Brits understand it, their meaning for the word "Guy" is entirely different... "a penny for the Guy?"

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    #3

    Re: "you guys"

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    You can say you guys, but only if everyone is about your age and it feels fraternal. You folks is a good alternative which is less informal, and perhaps acceptable with all audiences. You guys is distinctly American, however, and although Brits understand it, their meaning for the word "Guy" is entirely different... "a penny for the Guy?"
    What is the meaning of "a penny for the Guy"?

    ju


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    #4

    Re: "you guys"

    Guy Fawkes Night (also known as Bonfire Night, Cracker Night, Fireworks Night) is an annual celebration on the evening of the 5th of November. It celebrates the foiling of the Gunpowder Plot of the 5 November, 1605, in which a number of Catholic conspirators, including Guy Fawkes, were alleged to be attempting to blow up the Houses of Parliament, in London, England.
    (wiki)

    Children stuff a shirt and pair of trousers with paper and straw ( and similarly, something used for the head), and fasten them together, and go from door to door, pulling a billy cart with the Guy on it, singing:
    Remember, remember the fifth of November
    It's Gunpowder, Treason and Plot.
    Put your hand in your pocket and pull out your purse
    A ha'penny or a penny will do you no harm.
    *****

    Hence, - 'a penny for the Guy"...

    …and thereby, children make money, similar to ‘going a’ Wassailing’ (carol singing) at Christmas ; and in the States,’ trick or treating’ for candy on Halloween.



    ****I remember the first two lines from my youth, the verse itself I found on the Web, but isn't as I remember it - and it doesn't rhyme. Anyone remember? Something like, 'give a penny for the Guy'.
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Jun-2009 at 15:02.


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    #5

    Re: "you guys"

    Remember, remember the Fifth of November,
    the gunpowder treason and plot
    I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason
    should ever be forgot.

    I'm not British; that's from V for Vendetta. There are more here:
    Guy Fawkes Night - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You guys is American, particularly from the northern states or New England area (in some places they may even say "yous guys"). In the South, people say y'all, but it's best if you pronounce it with the drawl.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "you guys"

    "You guys" is perfectly acceptable when addressing a group in AmE, but it is distinctly American. During a visit to a convention in England I was chatting with a small group and it was getting near dinner time. I asked "Are you guys hungry? Anyone interested in getting some dinner?" My remark was greeted with chuckles all around, and one man said "'You guys.' That is so American!" (I guess I would have blended in better had I said "you lot.") I married a man from Georgia (the deep American South), so I've also picked up the habit of addressing a group as "y'all" or "you all." The meaning is understood anywhere in the U.S., but you'll get a quizzical glance from the group if you don't have a Southern accent.

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