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    #1

    difference

    difference between homophone and homonym

  2. Senior Member
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    #2

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by teacherjulia View Post
    This is extremely easy to look up. I recommend typing in google: homophone homonym.

    homo means same.
    phone means sound, as in telephone

    So, homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled differently:
    heir, air. Blue, blew.

    nym means name.
    Homonyms, however, are words that have the same "names". They are spelled the same but have different meanings.

    The girl has a bow in her hair.
    The man is holding a bow and arrow.
    After a play is finished, the actors bow on the stage.
    Thank you very much
    I know that but I get very confused because some websites don't differentiate between them.


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    #3

    Re: difference

    This is getting more and more confusing the more I look it up. Sources are conflicting.

    So, according to The Little, Brown Handbook:

    Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same but have different spellings and meanings, such as heard/herd and to/too/two.

    My use of bow was wrong, because
    "Take a bow" and "bow and arrow" are pronounced differently.

    Furthermore, homophone is used as a definition of homonym in Merriam Webster's.

    The Cambridge Dictionary defines it as: a word that is spelled the same as another word but that does not have the same meaning

    And finally, on wikipedia (which isn't necessarily the most reliable):
    Homophones
    (literally "same sound") are words that share the same pronunciation regardless of how they are spelled. Homophones may be spelled the same (in which case they are also homographs) or spelled differently (in which case they are heterographs). Homographic examples include tire (to become weary) and tire (on the wheel of a car). Heterographic examples include to, too, two, and there, their, they’re.

    Homonyms
    can therefore be seen as the subset of homophones that are spelled the same, which is logically the same as the subset of homographs that are pronounced the same. This means words that are spelled and pronounced the same (but have different meanings).

    So that serves me right for going off of what I truly believed was correct information. Sorry about that!!!

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    #4

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by teacherjulia View Post
    This is getting more and more confusing the more I look it up. Sources are conflicting.

    So, according to The Little, Brown Handbook:

    Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same but have different spellings and meanings, such as heard/herd and to/too/two.

    My use of bow was wrong, because
    "Take a bow" and "bow and arrow" are pronounced differently.

    Furthermore, homophone is used as a definition of homonym in Merriam Webster's.

    The Cambridge Dictionary defines it as: a word that is spelled the same as another word but that does not have the same meaning

    And finally, on wikipedia (which isn't necessarily the most reliable):
    Homophones (literally "same sound") are words that share the same pronunciation regardless of how they are spelled. Homophones may be spelled the same (in which case they are also homographs) or spelled differently (in which case they are heterographs). Homographic examples include tire (to become weary) and tire (on the wheel of a car). Heterographic examples include to, too, two, and there, their, they’re.

    Homonyms can therefore be seen as the subset of homophones that are spelled the same, which is logically the same as the subset of homographs that are pronounced the same. This means words that are spelled and pronounced the same (but have different meanings).

    So that serves me right for going off of what I truly believed was correct information. Sorry about that!!!
    Thank you my teacher
    It is really very confusing even for a content writer.
    50 homonym words that confuse a content writer

    Teacher,
    Also in this link
    I think that those examples are neither homonyms nor homophones.
    Last edited by sash2008; 10-Jun-2009 at 01:35.


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    #5

    Re: difference

    I think you're right...I would call that
    50 commonly confused words for content writers.

    According to her own definition, those are not homonyms. Some of them are homophones, though, such as alter/altar.

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    #6

    Re: difference

    Sorry,
    I just want to know the relationship between light (the opposite of dark) and light (the opposite of heavy). Is it polysemy or homonymy?

    between knight and night

    pupil ( a young student ) and pupil ( the small black round area in the middle of your eye).


    fall (autumn) and fall (to drop)
    Last edited by sash2008; 10-Jun-2009 at 02:15.

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    #7

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by sash2008 View Post
    sorry,
    i just want to know the relationship between light (the opposite of dark) and light (the opposite of heavy). Is it polysemy or homonymy?
    i'd call these homonyms. they do not seem to be related by meaning.

    between knight and night
    no relation - homophones,(so not homonyms)

    pupil ( a young student ) and pupil ( the small black round area in the middle of your eye). there is no connection here. The words are merely homonyms.

    fall (autumn) and fall (to drop) polysemous. the season derives from falling leaves, so they are related.
    r.

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