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  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Arabic
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      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 519
    #1

    link

    Homonym List - Homonym List for English Learners - Letters F - L

    in this link, are those examples considered homonymy?
    I think they are homophones.


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 35
    #2

    Re: link

    I thought the same thing too, and I even posted a response to you! Doing a little more research I learned this:

    HOMONYMS are words that sound alike but have different meanings. Homophones are a type of homonym that also sound alike and have different meanings, but have different spellings.

    So technically that list IS a list of homonyms, but more specifically they are homophones.

    It's sort of like saying
    Here is a list of aquatic animals:
    salmon
    pike
    trout
    catfish

    More precisely it is a list of fish, but it's not wrong to use aquatic animals.

  2. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
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    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 519
    #3

    Re: link

    Quote Originally Posted by teacherjulia View Post
    I thought the same thing too, and I even posted a response to you! Doing a little more research I learned this:
    Quote Originally Posted by teacherjulia View Post

    HOMONYMS are words that sound alike but have different meanings. Homophones are a type of homonym that also sound alike and have different meanings, but have different spellings.

    So technically that list IS a list of homonyms, but more specifically they are homophones.

    It's sort of like saying
    Here is a list of aquatic animals:
    salmon
    pike
    trout
    catfish

    More precisely it is a list of fish, but it's not wrong to use aquatic animals.
    Oh, yes
    Thank you
    I get it
    What I understand is:

    Homonyms are classified into two groups:

    1. Some homonyms are spelled the same, like bark (the sound a dog makes) and bark (the outer layer of a tree trunk).
    train /train
    mean/ mean
    can/ can
    light/ light

    2. Some homonyms are spelled differently and called homophones, like
    by /buy
    I/ eye
    night/ knight

    Am I right?


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 35
    #4

    Re: link

    This is getting more and more confusing the more I look it up. Sources are conflicting.

    So, according to The Little, Brown Handbook: Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same but have different spellings and meanings, such as heard/herd and to/too/two.

    Homophone
    is used as a definition of homonym in Merriam Webster's.

    The Cambridge Dictionary defines it as: a word that is spelled the same as another word but that does not have the same meaning

    And finally, on wikipedia (which isn't necessarily the most reliable):
    Homophones
    (literally "same sound") are words that share the same pronunciation regardless of how they are spelled. Homophones may be spelled the same (in which case they are also homographs) or spelled differently (in which case they are heterographs). Homographic examples include tire (to become weary) and tire (on the wheel of a car). Heterographic examples include to, too, two, and there, their, they’re.

    Homonyms
    can therefore be seen as the subset of homophones that are spelled the same, which is logically the same as the subset of homographs that are pronounced the same. This means words that are spelled and pronounced the same (but have different meanings).

    So that serves me right for going off of what I truly believed was correct information. Sorry about that!!!

    SO...

    Long story short: Sources differ.

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