Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. phorntita's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 212
    #1

    Once bitten,twice shy

    It's because my work concern a writing about the 'Idiom'. But sometimes I found that some dictionary uses the word 'saying' or 'informal' instead of 'idiom' I'm curious what is the difference among these 3 words when referring to the same word? clarify me please.
    Last edited by phorntita; 11-Jun-2009 at 15:06. Reason: information added

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #2

    Re: Once bitten,twice shy

    An idiom is a phrase, etc, whose meaning is not clear from the definitions of the individual words- you'd struggle to understand why someone is saying that they will eat their hat from the individual words.

    A saying is a standard phrase or sentence people often use when a particular situation arises. If you know the words, you'll get the meaning of some sayings, but not all:
    1 Dime a dozen
    2 Dollars for doughnuts
    As long as you know what a dime is (a ten-cent coin), the first suggests that something is cheap, but the meaning of the second is much less clear. The second is idiomatic, the first less so.

    'Informal' is different; it means that we use the word, idiom, etc, when we are speaking in a relaxed manner. Not all idioms are informal and many words, etc, that are not idioms are informal- it just means the language we use among friends, etc.

  2. phorntita's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 212
    #3

    Re: Once bitten,twice shy

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    An idiom is a phrase, etc, whose meaning is not clear from the definitions of the individual words- you'd struggle to understand why someone is saying that they will eat their hat from the individual words.

    A saying is a standard phrase or sentence people often use when a particular situation arises. If you know the words, you'll get the meaning of some sayings, but not all:
    1 Dime a dozen
    2 Dollars for doughnuts
    As long as you know what a dime is (a ten-cent coin), the first suggests that something is cheap, but the meaning of the second is much less clear. The second is idiomatic, the first less so.

    'Informal' is different; it means that we use the word, idiom, etc, when we are speaking in a relaxed manner. Not all idioms are informal and many words, etc, that are not idioms are informal- it just means the language we use among friends, etc.
    So it means that when I once found some words that appeared to be called an 'Idiom' in one dictionary and also appeared to be called 'saying' in another dictionary just like this title ' Once bitten, twice shy' . I could pick it up as one of my interesting 'idioms' before explaining its meaning together with its examples to my audiences. How does it sound? please

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #4

    Re: Once bitten,twice shy

    That's fine. You will see things classified differently in dictionaries- it's not an exact science.

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] Once bitten,twice shy
    By phorntita in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-Jun-2009, 07:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •