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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    moan vs groan

    Dear teacher!
    Can you tell me the differences between groan and moan? To my knowledge, groan means to utter a deep, mournful sound expressive of pain or grief, and moan means to utter moans, as of pain or grief. So what's the differences? For example, in this sentence :" We had to listen to him ... [groaning/moaning] about how he didn't have any money"? Which word do I have to use? Thanks so much!!!

  2. nyota's Avatar
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    #2

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: moan vs groan

    Thank you! So in that sentence I offered, it's moaning, okie?

  4. nyota's Avatar
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    #4

    Post Re: moan vs groan

    According to the definitions both moan (about/at/that...) and groan (seems to stand on its own in this context) can mean to complain. What's more, they often go together:

    I'm tired of him moaning and groaning all the time.
    He moaned and groaned all the way there.


    It's hard for me to say which option sounds most natural to a native speaker.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: moan vs groan

    "moaning and groaning" are often used together. For complaining, they mean pretty much the same.
    However, we say "moaning with pleasure, or desire", not "groaning". This is the only context I can think of where it would make a difference.

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