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Thread: verbs

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    #11

    Re: verbs

    Well I like that, it's interesting. In your roundabout way you are saying, hidden is an adjective in The ring was hidden.
    Not quite: I would say that it is a participle which may or may not be functioning adjectivally depending on the intended meaning, i.e. on whether the sentence is predicated as a description or as an action. (In the absence of a disambiguating adverbial, obviously either is equally possible).

    So preposing an adverb turns an adjective into a verb of sorts.
    Not necessarily! If I were to say e.g.

    The diamond was well hidden.

    'hidden' would retain its adjectival sense despite the presence of the adverb 'well'.

    But if I ever come up with an adjective that can be modified by quickly, I'll let you know!!!
    Please do!

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    #12

    Re: verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post

    But if I ever come up with an adjective that can be modified by quickly, I'll let you know!!!
    Please do!
    Achilles struck Hector, and his foe was quickly dead.

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    #13

    Re: verbs

    Good try Raymott, but isn't dead just the Past Participle of to die?
    But this brings me neatly to what has been bothering me lately: why do adverbs have an order? Any explanations?

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    #14

    Re: verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    Good try Raymott, but isn't dead just the Past Participle of to die?
    But this brings me neatly to what has been bothering me lately: why do adverbs have an order? Any explanations?
    No, 'dead' is an adjective. The past participle of 'die' is 'died' (die, died, died).
    If I'd written: Achilles struck Hector, and his foe was quickly killed you would have a point.
    Adverbial order has been discussed in other recent threads. It has not been conclusively determined why they have an order.

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    #15

    Re: verbs

    He dies, he is dying, he died, he is dead.

    he was quickly dead, is the same as ring was quickly hidden. It won't be easy to find an adjective, which is not a participle, which can be modified by quickly. But we can try!!

    As far as I can ascertain, adverbs can be put into classes, lower, higher but no one on Earth has a good explanation for why they should have a hierarchy. But apparently this order is more or less constant across languages. If you're in the Outback, ask some of the Aborigines, would be interesting!

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    #16

    Re: verbs

    Sorry Raymott, you are right of course, had my head somewhere else. Looking at an article on COMP and Italian dialects. Well done for finding that, hope Philo reads it

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    He dies, he is dying, he died, he is dead.

    he was quickly dead, is the same as ring was quickly hidden. It won't be easy to find an adjective, which is not a participle, which can be modified by quickly. But we can try!!

    As far as I can ascertain, adverbs can be put into classes, lower, higher but no one on Earth has a good explanation for why they should have a hierarchy. But apparently this order is more or less constant across languages. If you're in the Outback, ask some of the Aborigines, would be interesting!

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    #17

    Re: verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Achilles struck Hector, and his foe was quickly dead.
    Nice try indeed, but 'quickly' here does not actually modify the adjective dead, as does e.g. 'completely' in completely dead. It is merely serving as a kind of substitute temporal adverbial meaning 'soon', and as such is an adjunct to the verb phrase.

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    #18

    Re: verbs

    As you might expect I can't go along with that.

    He was quickly dead. How can you 'be' quickly? You can walk quickly, run quickly. *I am 'being' quickly
    How was he? *He was quickly.
    Life seems short, but not because I 'am' quickly.
    So I'll choose quickly, or very quickly as modifiers of 'dead'.

    Time for food.


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    #19

    Re: verbs

    PEdro,

    You are barking up the wrong tree without fail again.

    Achilles struck Hector, and his foe was quickly dead. expresses two subsequent events with very short delay.

    Very soon after (quickly) Achilles' act of striking, Hector became dead.
    (Q)uickly serves as a temporal adjunct anchored to the VP (was dead).

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    #20

    Re: verbs

    A temporal adjunct: you mean an adverb, I presume, you're just trying to impress me with technical terms. But we had established that already.
    We have two sentences, joined by a conjunction. I'll regard the second one.

    He was quickly dead. 'was' a linking verb. Quickly describes either He, was or dead.
    As you can't exist, 'be', quickly, that leaves he or dead as target. Adverbs don't modify nouns, or pronouns. What does that leave?

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