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    #1

    What does it mean?

    I usually practice English at BBC and VOA website. Yesterday I read an article about "Election of Judges" at VOA News - Money, Influence and the Election of Judges. I have spent a day to study the following paragraph and now I still don't understand the meaning of it.
    "Elected judges in the United States got a warning this week about money, politics and the law. The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor. "

    Could anyone tell me what "The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor" mean? Thank you.

  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by quangninh View Post
    I usually practice English at BBC and VOA website. Yesterday I read an article about "Election of Judges" at VOA News - Money, Influence and the Election of Judges. I have spent a day to study the following paragraph and now I still don't understand the meaning of it.
    "Elected judges in the United States got a warning this week about money, politics and the law. The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor. "

    Could anyone tell me what "The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor" mean? Thank you.
    [I am not a teacher]

    Let's put it this way... you're a donor, you donated $1bn last year. But... as it may happen to anyone, you committed a crime, and of course, victims will press charges. Cutting to the chase... The Supreme Court will take into account the fact that you have been a very generous donor and they will let you go unpunished.
    Last edited by Offroad; 19-Jun-2009 at 09:10. Reason: typo

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by quangninh View Post
    I usually practice English at BBC and VOA website. Yesterday I read an article about "Election of Judges" at VOA News - Money, Influence and the Election of Judges. I have spent a day to study the following paragraph and now I still don't understand the meaning of it.
    "Elected judges in the United States got a warning this week about money, politics and the law. The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor. "

    Could anyone tell me what "The Supreme Court ruled that a huge campaign donation can be reason enough not to judge a case involving the donor" mean? Thank you.
    My understanding differs from marciobarbalho's.
    It's not a good sentence.
    Since judges are elected, if a person X donates a lot of money to have a Judge Y elected, Judge Y should not sit in judgement if donor X is charged with something. There is no suggestion that donor X should not go on trial; only that a different judge should preside.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What does it mean?

    yes, Ray, I agree with you, I did not click the link.

    I am sorry, quangninh.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What does it mean?

    Yes, "not to judge" in this case means to recuse oneself, rather than to set the accused free.

    P.S. I recommend propaganda-free news reading, and suggest <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk">The Guardian</a>, <a href="http://www.elpais.com">El País</a>, <a href="http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr">Le Monde Diplomatique</a>, and perhaps the BBC and the Independent. VOA is rather one-sided and favours US commercial interests at the expense of global multipolarity.
    Last edited by konungursvia; 19-Jun-2009 at 13:07.


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    #6

    Re: What does it mean?

    Thank you Raymott. Your explaination is very clear and it helps me to understand the whole article. Now I know the reason why the paragraph makes me confused. There is a difference in culture between my country and the US. In my country, there is no judges election. If someone want to be a judge, they must graduate from law university and have many years experience in law. Noone can use money to help themselve (or another people) to be a judge.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What does it mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by quangninh View Post
    Thank you Raymott. Your explaination is very clear and it helps me to understand the whole article. Now I know the reason why the paragraph makes me confused. There is a difference in culture between my country and the US. In my country, there is no judges election. If someone want to be a judge, they must graduate from law university and have many years experience in law. Noone can use money to help themselve (or another people) to be a judge.
    Yes, judges are not popularly elected in the British/Australian system either. They are appointed by government.

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