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    #1

    For well ye wot

    What is meaning of

    "For well ye wot that of this life
    There comes but lewd and bitter strife
    And death of men and great travail."

    Tnx


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: For well ye wot

    For you know well that life contains strife, bitterness, work and death.

    "wot" is an archaic word:
    AskOxford: wit<sup>2</sup>

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    #3

    Re: For well ye wot

    ye wot = ihr wisst


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #4

    Re: For well ye wot

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    ye wot = ihr wisst

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: For well ye wot

    In Spencer's and Shakespeare's English, I'd translate "travail" as trials and tribulations, rather than as work.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: For well ye wot

    This sort of 'wot' exists, colloquially, in the pseudo-hyperformal 'of which I wot not', and in the fossil 'wot-not' - used to describe this piece of furniture: http://www.riseleycottage.com/images/08wotnot.jpg. As it's hard to describe, it's often heard and understood as 'what-not'.

    b

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    #7

    Re: For well ye wot

    Travail in Webster's
    Function:
    noun
    Etymology:
    Middle English, from Anglo-French, from travailler to torment, labor, journey, from Vulgar Latin *trepaliare to torture, from Late Latin trepalium instrument of torture, from Latin tripalis having three stakes, from tri- + palus stake —

    Basically saying: work is torture. All agreed?? Thought so!

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