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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Question more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Look at Fata Lemes, the Muslim bar waitress who won ?3,000 compensation this week for quitting her job after she objected to wearing a red cocktail dress.
    Apologies if I find it hard to keep a straight face, but my jaw keeps dropping open. Miss Lemes took the job in a bar and left after eight days, claiming managers asked her to wear a dress that made her look like a prostitute.
    Actually, the frock is conservative by London bar standards - more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow. But fair enough if Miss Lemes didn't like it.
    ALLISON PEARSON: No, madam in a burkha, you who have offended MY values | Mail Online

    What does the sentence I highlighted in blue mean? Thanks!

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    The Daily Mail is such trash! Low-brow, chauvinist rubbish. I'd read the Guardian or the Independent for a change, if you'd like to see excellent journalism from the UK.

    The sentence means "more tasteful than slutty," essentially, using popular style examples.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Question Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post

    The sentence means "more tasteful than slutty," essentially, using popular style examples.
    Hello konungursvia,

    Thank you. How does it mean that?

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Petersfield garden party = upper class elegant outdoor wear.
    Peter Stringfellow = cheap sexy undergarments

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Petersfield is a market town in southern England. It is in Hampshire, about 20 miles (30 kilometres) north of the city of Portsmouth. I lived there for 12 years.


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    #6

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    ALLISON PEARSON: No, madam in a burkha, you who have offended MY values | Mail Online

    What does the sentence I highlighted in blue mean? Thanks!
    Petersfield is a town south of London which is rather formal and staid [Sorry, bhaisahab]. The dress concerned was red and sleeveless, but might well be worn to a summer garden party.

    Peter Stringfellow owns and runs a nightclub, and is notorious for his refusal to allow anyone who is "ugly" entrance to the club. It indicates low moral stand and trashy, cheap clothing.

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Hi All,

    Thank you very much for your replies. Could any of you help me with the below questions?

    Q1 Is 'Petersfield' a town for upper class? Do most Britons know Petersfield?

    Q2 Can I say what she wears is Peter Stringfellow? Can most native speakers understand what I mean?

    Q3 I have gotten the info. about Peter Stringfellow. Except in the UK, is he famous worldwide?
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 20-Jun-2009 at 08:50.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    [quote=Anglika;485600]Petersfield is a town south of London which is rather formal and staid [Sorry, bhaisahab].

    You are right about it being rather formal and staid (at least on the surface), but like anywhere it really depends on who you know. It has, by the way, a marvellous antiquarian bookshop,The Petersfield Bookshop Website. 16A Chapel Street, Petersfield, Hampshire, England. and is surrounded by some beautiful countryside.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: more Petersfield garden party than Peter Stringfellow

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi All,

    Thank you very much for your replies. Could any of you help me with the below questions?

    Q1 Is 'Petersfield' a town for upper class? Do most Britons know Petersfield?
    Most British people have heard of it, and know that it's in the Home counties - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Q2 Can I say what she wears is Peter Stringfellow? Can most native speakers understand what I mean?
    It's not idiomatic; it's journalese, shorthand for 'her dress is [suggestive of the sort of taste that might be expected of someone like] Peter Stringfellow'.The journalist chose it because of the rhyme/assonance/alliteration.
    Q3 I have gotten the info. about Peter Stringfellow. Except in the UK, is he famous worldwide?
    I wouldn't imagine so. Perhaps people from further afield will correct me.

    b

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