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    #1

    if it will

    Would anyone please be so good as to just take a few moments to see if the following sentences are idiomatic?

    [1] I will stop watching TV when studying if I will maybe fail the exam.
    [2] I will stop watching TV when studying if it will make me fail the exam.
    [3] I will stop writing to her anymore if I will make her angry.
    [4] I will stop writing to her anymore if it will make her angry.

    Any and all comments would be appreciated.

    Hiro

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: if it will

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    Would anyone please be so good as to just take a few moments to see if the following sentences are idiomatic?

    [1] I will stop watching TV when studying if I will maybe fail the exam.
    [2] I will stop watching TV when studying if it will make me fail the exam.
    [3] I will stop writing to her anymore if I will make her angry.
    [4] I will stop writing to her anymore if it will make her angry.

    Any and all comments would be appreciated.

    Hiro
    I will stop watching TV while studying if it will make me fail the exam.
    This is correct, but it's ambiguous. What will make you fail the exam?: stopping the activity or continuing the activity?
    I will stop watching TV while studying if it will help me pass the exam.
    Stopping the activity will help you pass the exam.
    If stopping watching TV while studying will help me pass the exam, I'll do it.
    If watching TV while studying will make me fail the exam, I will stop it.
    (best).

    The second sentence contains the same ambiguity. Do you want to make her angry or not?
    If writing to her makes her angry, I'll stop it. (You don't want her to be angry)
    If stopping writing to her will make her angry, I'll do it. (You want to make her angry).

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    #3

    Re: if it will

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post

    If watching TV while studying will make me fail the exam, I will stop it.


    If writing to her makes her angry, I'll stop it.
    Thanks, Raymott.
    Can you retain 'will' in the second sentence, as in
    "If writing to her will make her angry, I'll stop it," as you did in the first?

    Hiro

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: if it will

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    Thanks, Raymott.
    Can you retain 'will' in the second sentence, as in
    "If writing to her will make her angry, I'll stop it," as you did in the first?

    Hiro
    It depends on the context.
    In this case, you don't want to make her angry. You are already writing to her. You could probably assume that if she was going to become angry in the future because of your writing to her, she would already be angry.
    So, "If writing to her makes her angry, ... " is sufficient.
    However if she tells you that, if you don't stop writing to her, she'll become angry, then the sentence with "will" is correct.
    Last edited by Raymott; 20-Jun-2009 at 15:14.

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