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    #1

    by/in/on

    Hi

    I came by/on a train.


    I came by/in a car.

    I suppose that both "by" are OK, what about "in" and "on"?

    thanks

  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: by/in/on

    We usually go on a train and in a car. But it's possible to hear in a train and on a car.

    However, you won't probably hear 'in a bike', or 'in a boat'.

    [I am not a teacher]

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: by/in/on

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    We usually go on a train and in a car. But it's possible to hear in a train and on a car.

    However, you won't probably hear 'in a bike', or 'in a boat'.

    [I am not a teacher]
    It is unlikely that you would hear 'on a car', certainly not from a native speaker.

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    #4

    Re: by/in/on

    OK, so in a car and on a train are fine. And I guess that "by" also works in both cases?

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    #5

    Re: by/in/on

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It is unlikely that you would hear 'on a car', certainly not from a native speaker.
    Agreed.
    But students must know that 'on a car' is possible, it depends on context.

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    #6

    Re: by/in/on

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    OK, so in a car and on a train are fine. And I guess that "by" also works in both cases?
    Yes, you can go by car or by train, but if the store is not so far I suggest going on foot.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: by/in/on

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Agreed.
    But students must know that 'on a car' is possible, it depends on context.
    Students should also understand that we do not travel on a car.

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    #8

    Re: by/in/on

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Students should also understand that we do not travel on a car.
    No, we don't travel on a car. Common sense says we should be in a car, but somehow we are also on a car.
    It's very uncommon, but it's possible to travel on a car if there's no sit left, it happens a lot in some third world countries.

    Bhai has the point.


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    #9

    Re: by/in/on

    1. come on a train
    2. come by a train
    Isn't #2 incorrect? Shouldn't "a" be deleted?

    train
    a railway/railroad engine pulling a number of coaches/cars or trucks, taking people and goods from one place to another: to get on / off a train I like travelling by train. a passenger / commuter / goods / freight train to catch / take / get the train to London a train journey / driver You have to change trains at Reading. There are regular train services to Edinburgh and Glasgow.

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    train
    a group of vehicles that travel on a track and are connected to each other and usually to an engine : a connected group of railroad cars

    [count]
    ▪ The train pulled into the station.
    ▪ You can get off/on the train in Atlanta.
    ▪ I took a train to Madrid.
    ▪ We caught the last train.
    ▪ We slept on the train.
    ▪ a passenger train [=a train that people use for traveling]
    ▪ a commuter train [=a train that people use to get to and from work]
    ▪ an express train [=a train that has very few stops]
    ▪ a subway train [=an underground train]
    ▪ (US) a freight train = (Brit) a goods train [=a train carrying cargo]

    [noncount]
    ▪ We traveled by train through Europe.

    —often used before another noun
    ▪ a train [=railroad] station
    ▪ train tracks
    ▪ a train schedule/signal/ticket
    ▪ a train crash = (US) a train wreck

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