Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 25
    #1

    Out of my league, in a league of his own

    Hi, Can anyone explain to me what they mean? Thank you.

    1) A husband avoided his problems instead of dealing with them. His wife said, "I really feel out of my league here."

    2) He is in a league of his own.

  1. csheywood's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 136
    #2

    Re: Out of my league, in a league of his own

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheeszz View Post
    Hi, Can anyone explain to me what they mean? Thank you.

    1) A husband avoided his problems instead of dealing with them. His wife said, "I really feel out of my league here."
    I would say, for this context, 'out of my depth', since the wife doesn't have enough experience for the situation. Usually something or someone is out of my league; I don't say I feel out of my league.

    2) He is in a league of his own.
    .
    'League' is often used in sport and it's helpful to remember this when we think that it refers to 'level' or 'grade'. So if a person is in a league of his own he is at a greater level than the average. eg. I would say 'Roger Federer is in a league of his own.' Of course, it's my opinion but many people will agree - I hope
    I can also use this outside of the context of sport.

    Also see the example given in the glossary on this site:
    Out of my league - Idiom Definition - UsingEnglish.com

  2. jackolantern's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 94
    #3

    Re: Out of my league, in a league of his own

    I am not a teacher, but I am a native speaker.

    Also, "out of my league" is often used in a slang way outside of sports or competitions. When used outside of those areas, people sometimes use it to say "that person is too good looking (or too rich, famous or whatever) for me to try to approach them for a date".

    When used like this, it is usually used like "I can't go talk to her! She is out of my league!" You would not say "I feel out of my league" if you want to use the term in this way.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 25
    #4

    Re: Out of my league, in a league of his own

    Thank you for your help
    Last edited by Cheeszz; 26-Jun-2009 at 19:56.

Similar Threads

  1. your column is in a league of its own=?
    By thedaffodils in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2009, 15:11
  2. boy-band league
    By GUEST2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14-Jan-2009, 15:10
  3. Paragraph on Indian Premier League (IPL)
    By new2grammar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-Jun-2008, 12:23
  4. Pitbull League Division
    By Sara_Italy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2008, 14:59
  5. jointed the big league.
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2007, 11:23

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •