Results 1 to 5 of 5

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    In need of a term

    What is it called when someone takes on an accent of someone else? For example, I do not have a strong U.S. southern accent. When I am around someone who is VERY southern, I find that my southern accent becomes more pronounced. What is that called? Thanks!
    Rosie

  1. csheywood's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 136
    #2

    Re: In need of a term

    Quote Originally Posted by rosie maum View Post
    What is it called when someone takes on an accent of someone else? For example, I do not have a strong U.S. southern accent. When I am around someone who is VERY southern, I find that my southern accent becomes more pronounced. What is that called? Thanks!
    Rosie
    Mimic, imitate are my first thoughts. (I think it's alright to use these in the context, even though I imagine the imitation isn't intentional.)


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #3

    Re: In need of a term


  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #4

    Re: In need of a term

    I'd say imitation or mimesis are the words.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #5

    Re: In need of a term

    Quote Originally Posted by rosie maum View Post
    What is it called when someone takes on an accent of someone else? For example, I do not have a strong U.S. southern accent. When I am around someone who is VERY southern, I find that my southern accent becomes more pronounced. What is that called? Thanks!
    Rosie
    I'm pretty sure it's still "accomodation" as in this thread:
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/p...t-related.html

Similar Threads

  1. nonsexist term
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2008, 19:39
  2. term extension
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2008, 02:34
  3. In his first term or At its(his) first term?
    By Falcon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-Nov-2006, 19:42
  4. Does anyone know the history of the term 'owlhoot?'
    By Celestina1810 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Feb-2006, 05:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •