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Thread: stamped around


    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #1

    Red face stamped around

    Another question. This is the statement:
    "Walt stamped around the loft mocking us as sentimental fools".
    I cannot understand the right meaning of the verb in bold. Can you help me?
    Thank you.
    Giduca.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stamped around

    Quote Originally Posted by giduca View Post
    Another question. This is the statement:
    "Walt stamped around the loft mocking us as sentimental fools".
    I cannot understand the right meaning of the verb in bold. Can you help me?
    Thank you.
    Giduca.
    'To stamp around' means to walk around heavily.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: stamped around

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    'To stamp around' means to walk around heavily.
    A minor point of grammar, if I may:
    I don't think this is a phrasal verb, otherwise it would read: "Walt stamped around in the loft mocking us as sentimental fools".
    "Stamp" also means to walk around heavily. And "around the loft" is where it happened - 'around' being a simple preposition. N'est pas?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: stamped around

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    A minor point of grammar, if I may:
    I don't think this is a phrasal verb, otherwise it would read: "Walt stamped around in the loft mocking us as sentimental fools".
    "Stamp" also means to walk around heavily. And "around the loft" is where it happened - 'around' being a simple preposition. N'est pas?
    For a ha'porth of tar, the ship was lost, for the sake of a preposition, the teacher was lost.

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