Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 514
    #1

    less-demanding & "would"

    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from Dough: A Memoir by Mort Zachter:

    "Uncle Harry, on the other hand, didn't know from Torah. He was a business man. When Max died, Uncle Harry was twenty-six and still working his way through college. It would take him ten years of perseverance and a transfer from City College to the then less-demanding NYU School of Commerce to earn his accounting degree. "

    Does less-demanding mean that NYU charges a lower tuition fee?
    Besides, why does the author say "it would take" instead of "it took"? In this case, has uncle Harry earned his accounting degree or not?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 1,948
    #2

    Re: less-demanding & "would"

    Hi Eway

    1. would = used to [ here]

    2. less demanding might mean:

    less taxing
    less chalenging
    less authoritative

    all of them or one of them.

    My opinion : less authoritative


    Regards,

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #3

    Re: less-demanding & "would"

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from Dough: A Memoir by Mort Zachter:

    "Uncle Harry, on the other hand, didn't know from Torah. He was a business man. When Max died, Uncle Harry was twenty-six and still working his way through college. It would take him ten years of perseverance and a transfer from City College to the then less-demanding NYU School of Commerce to earn his accounting degree. "

    Does less-demanding mean that NYU charges a lower tuition fee?
    Besides, why does the author say "it would take" instead of "it took"? In this case, has uncle Harry earned his accounting degree or not?
    Generally, 'less demanding' in education means 'easier'. It was easier to pass the course at NYU School of Commerce than at City College.

    "it would take" simply means "it took". It doesn't mean "used to" - in any case "it used to take him ten years ... " is not grammatical.
    Yes, he has earned his accounting degree.
    This construction isn't used very often, and it's usually only found in narratives. In this case, the focal point in time is when Max died, not the present. At that time, it would take Uncle Harry another ten years to earn his degree.

    Here are some more examples:
    1. The earth began 4 billion years ago. It would take another 3.9 billion years for life to evolve. (Taking 4 billion years ago as the time reference, it would take another 3.9 billion years from then ...)
    2. When I was in 5th grade at school, I used to dream of being a High School student. But it would be another three years before my dream came true.

Similar Threads

  1. Who "would" hide your cap in the tree?
    By sitifan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2008, 05:26
  2. [Grammar] "would" In Conditional
    By akshay vyas in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2008, 11:54
  3. proper use of "would" in past tense
    By Poetess in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Jun-2008, 23:24
  4. epistemic "would"
    By ratna in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Feb-2007, 01:05
  5. gerunds
    By notmyname216 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2004, 12:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •