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    #1

    What does the "it" refer to?

    Dear all,

    ..."Pick out your favorite star," Dad said that night. He told me I could have it for keeps. He said it was my Christmas present.
    "You can't give me a star!" I said. "No one owns the stars."
    "That's right,"Dad said. "No one else owns them. You just have to claim it before anyone else does, like Columbus claimed America for Queen Isabella. Claiming a star as your own has just as much logic to it."

    In the passage above, what does the underlined it refer to?

    Thank you

    OP

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What does the "it" refer to?

    Quote Originally Posted by optimistic pessimist View Post
    Dear all,

    ..."Pick out your favorite star," Dad said that night. He told me I could have it for keeps. He said it was my Christmas present.
    "You can't give me a star!" I said. "No one owns the stars."
    "That's right,"Dad said. "No one else owns them. You just have to claim it before anyone else does, like Columbus claimed America for Queen Isabella. Claiming a star as your own has just as much logic to it."

    In the passage above, what does the underlined it refer to?

    Thank you

    OP
    Assuming by underlined, you mean italised, the 'it' is part of the the phrase "to it". "It has logic to it" means "There is logic in it" - "it" being the proposition "Claiming a star as your own".
    "There is an much logic to it (in it, in the proposition) as there is in Columbus claiming America for Queen Isabella."
    "There is as much logic in claiming a star as your own as there is in Columbus claiming America for Queen Isabella.
    "to it" or "in it" is not really necessary. You could say: Claiming a star as your own is just as logical as Columbus claiming America for Queen Isabella.

    It's similar to "This sentence has no meaning to it" = "This sentence has no meaning". "To it" is redundant. It just refers back to "This sentence".

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