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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #1

    How to say the root of someone?

    Dear the forum,

    I'm a newbie here and I'm learning English. Firstly, let me say sorry if my question is duplicated to what someone has already posted.

    The problem I'm wondering is how to say, in English, the root of someone. For example, if there is a person who is an American, but lives all the time in France, then how do people call him? An American-root(ed) French or what?

    Do you understand my idea? If I make sense to you, please correct me the exact way to say. :)

    PS: sorry for my bad English, as a learner. If you can, please be so kind to answer me here, to email to me: thieuvan@gmail.com. Thanks a lot.

    My kind regards

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    #2

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    Hello, I'm 'THe French',

    The right word you are looking for is "expatriate".

    Go to the Cambridge Dictionaries to see the definition.

    Have a nice day.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #3

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    Dear The French,

    Thank you for the answer.

    But maybe you misunderstand me, I don't aim to ask you for the right word of this case, I know the word "expatriate", but if I say an expatriated American, people will just know he's from America. I want to say a person lives all the time in french, but he has origin from american. How to mix the word?

    Anyway, it sounds complicated, I know. In English maybe they don't say like that or don't have that way of saying, do they?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    Either 'he's from America' (!) or 'he has American roots'/'his roots are American' - note the plural; it's not his 'root'. There was a very influential book/TV series called Roots: The Saga of an American Family - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia . There are lots of 'Trace your roots' websites; Google will find them for you.

    b

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    #5

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    Hello,

    I understand what you are looking for, but for me there is no word that tell us those two senses.

    It's easier to say, I'm from one country and now 'I live in France' for example.

    Have nice day.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    Quote Originally Posted by ThieuVan View Post
    ....
    Anyway, it sounds complicated, I know. In English maybe they don't say like that or don't have that way of saying, do they?

    There's no complication. Native speakers of English use the term 'roots' - as I said.

    b

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    #7

    Re: How to say the root of someone?

    an American living in France

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