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    #1

    ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    My dear and respected teachers,

    1: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    2: ''He is older than me by 2 years.'' correct?

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    #2

    Smile Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Quote Originally Posted by twilit1988 View Post
    My dear and respected teachers,

    1: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    2: ''He is older than me by 2 years.'' correct?
    Hello, I'm The French, for the first quote, show belong:

    the thirties (A person's thirties are the period in which they are aged between 30 and 39:)

    Go to the Cambridge Dictionnaries Online, you will find what you are looking for.

    It's ok for me sentence two, but I prefer:

    ''He is older than me by two years.'

    I'm not a teacher, have a nice day.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    1 People who're some unspecified number of years more than 30 are 'thirty-something'; I imagine some people who're more than 40 would be happy to be regarded as 'thirty something' At going on 58, I don't think I'd get away with calling myself that. Notes: 'thirty-something' is informal, and seems to be grammatically pretty flexible. Some sit-coms are described in TV-listings as 'A group of thirty-somethings...'.

    2 What's wrong with 'he is 2 years older than me'? 'He is older than me by 2 years' is not ungrammatical, but it sounds a bit stilted in most contexts (for example, it would be OK to say 'they're both older than me - Martin by 2 years and Robin by 3'.

    b

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    In India the human life cycle has been divided into 5 distinct categories according to age-slab, as indicated below.

    1. Childhood (Child) early stage of life – 12 years and below
    2. adolescent (Teenager) developing into an adult - 13-17 years
    3. Adult-young (Young) fully developed - 18-39 years
    4. Middle aged (half old) beyond adulthood - 40-60 years
    5. Old -60 years and above
    But there is no slab between 30 to 50'', so as suggested by Bobk you can only say thirty something

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    #5

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Hello,
    In France, we have one word for each categories of age (20 to 30; 30 to 40,etc..).
    Indeed, I don't call a person who is 41 years old an thirties, but is it the same in English?
    Have a great nice day (sorry for my mistakes, but I have learnt alone English).

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    #6

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,
    In France, we have one word for each categories of age (20 to 30; 30 to 40,etc..).
    Indeed, I don't call a person who is 41 years old an thirties, but is it the same in English?
    Have a great nice day (sorry for my mistakes, but I have learnt alone English).
    No - you've misunderstood. We do have words for the decades. You can say someone is in their twenties/thirties/forties... - any exact decade. Someone who is 41 is not 'in his thirties' .

    But the original post asked for a word for someone between 30 and 50. The nearest word for that is the less precise (and quite informal) 'thirty-something'.

    b

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No - you've misunderstood. We do have words for the decades. You can say someone is in their twenties/thirties/forties... - any exact decade. Someone who is 41 is not 'in his thirties' .

    But the original post asked for a word for someone between 30 and 50. The nearest word for that is the less precise (and quite informal) 'thirty-something'.

    b


    Agreed. Folks in their 40s and 50s often don't care to be so specifically identified a such, so "thirty-something" is an appropriate way of saying "well, they're over 30 but they're not yet collecting a pension..."

    In the US, the definition of "middle age" is constantly being raised upward (thanks to the aging Baby Boomers who don't care to admit they're getting older). The common expression these days is "60 is the new 40," meaning today's 60-year-olds are really the same age mentally and physically as 40-year-olds were a decade or two ago.

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    #8

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Generation Y, also known as The Millennial Generation, is a term used to describe the demographic cohort following Generation X. Its members are often referred to as "Millennials"[1] or "Echo Boomers"[2]) . There are no precise dates for when Gen Y starts and ends. Most commentators use dates from the early 1980s to early 1990s.[Members of Generation Y are primarily the offspring of the Baby Boom Generation.

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    #9

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    But that would only refer to this batch of people of that age, and not all batches. While Generation X is used, I must confess that I haven't heard Generation Y being used in the UK.

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    #10

    Re: ''Is there a special word for people who are between 30 to 50''?

    Hello,

    I have understand the first quote, but however I ask the question because this combination with these two words "thirties and something" is for me too vague.

    I read your discussion, and I mean like a big part of French, we don't say the age for woman, it's very impolite for us.

    I agree that people around the world want to stay young all their life but it's very hard to stop the time or fight against it.

    The only way it's to accept that.

    Have a nice great day and thanks for your replies, who help me to improve my level.

    "Au revoir"

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