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    #1

    off-the-cuff

    Dear teachers,

    Here are two sentences that consist the expression “off-the-cuff”.

    Some presidents like to speak off-the-cuff to newspaper reporters but others prefer to think questions over and write their…
    off the cuff = spontaneous, not prepared in advance; impromptu:

    He knew some English. ... It was enough to serve as a warning to us to be careful of any off-the-cuff comments in English.
    off-the-cuff = irrelevant, inappropriate, unsuitable, impertinent

    Would you be kind enough to tel me whether I am right in my allegation that the expression in question have a positive or a negative connotation dependent on the context?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: off-the-cuff

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    He knew some English. ... It was enough to serve as a warning to us to be careful of any off-the-cuff comments in English.
    off-the-cuff = irrelevant, inappropriate, unsuitable, impertinent.
    I agree with your opinion!!!


    And i think off-the-cuff here may mean "arbitrary " or "dogmatic " Of course, it's my own opinion!!!

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: off-the-cuff

    "Off the cuff" usually means impromptu, spontaneous or unprepared.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: off-the-cuff

    Agreeing completley with Ouisch and just adding that there is no negative or postivie association with the phrase. Speaking "off the cuff" simply means that your remarks were not prepared in advance. That alone is neither good nor bad (though some people are terrible public speakers and if they are not well-prepared, they simply should not speak to the public, so speaking off the cuff probably won't turn out well for them).

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