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    #1

    Question Can't or cannot ?

    Hello,

    one easy quote for you.

    Which is the correct sentence "Be quiet, cannot you?" or "Be quiet, can't you?".

    Is it the contraction for can + not, canno't?

    Please explain your answer clearly, it's a little mix in my mind.

    Thank for your reply.

    The French.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,

    one easy quote for you.

    Which is the correct sentence "Be quiet, cannot you?" or "Be quiet, can't you?".

    Is it the contraction for can + not, canno't?

    Please explain your answer clearly, it's a little mix in my mind.

    Thank for your reply.

    The French.
    Can't can be a contraction of cannot, but in the case of your sentence can't you is a contraction of can you not.

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    #3

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Good afternoon teacher,

    I read your answer, but I am so surprised.
    You write that the contraction of can you not is can't you; is it one exception or the use of the imperative form in this sentence?

    Perhaps it's just like it.

    Thank for your collaboration and your fast answer perhaps a little short for me.

    Have a nice day and good lunch.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Good afternoon teacher,

    I read your answer, but I am so surprised.
    You write that the contraction of can you not is can't you; is it one exception or the use of the imperative form in this sentence?

    Perhaps it's just like it.

    Thank for your collaboration and your fast answer perhaps a little short for me.

    Have a nice day and good lunch.
    Can't you = can you not. Haven't you = have you not. Didn't you = did you not.

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post

    Is it the contraction for can + not, canno't?
    No. The the apostrophe (') represents a vowel; e.g., can not => can't.

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    #6

    Question Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    No. The the apostrophe (') represents a vowel; e.g., can not => can't.
    Hello,

    I am 'The French' thank for reply, but I would like to know if is it a English grammar rule this ' ?

    I am thinking about the use for 's in the possessive form.

    Waiting for your answer, pehaps you have it in your knowledge.

    Have nice day.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,

    I am 'The French' thank for reply, but I would like to know if is it a English grammar rule this ' ?

    I am thinking about the use for 's in the possessive form.

    Waiting for your answer, pehaps you have it in your knowledge.

    Have nice day.
    Many learners find the apostrophe confusing with good reason. It can be used to denote possession: 'This is Brian's car' for example. It can, as Soup has said, replace a vowel in a contraction: 'That's a good idea' (That is a good idea) for example. Where confusion often occurs is when learners mix up the two: 'This is Brian's car, Brian's a good driver.' In the first Brian's the apostrophe denotes possession and in the second it represents a contraction of Brian is. I try as far as possible not to use contractions with learners until they are more advanced.

  5. Soup's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,

    I am 'The French' thank for reply, but I would like to know if is it a English grammar rule this ' ?

    I am thinking about the use for 's in the possessive form.

    Waiting for your answer, pehaps you have it in your knowledge.

    Have nice day.
    Additionally, here's a good resource on contractions, Contractions Main Page.

  6. opa6x57's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello,

    one easy quote for you.

    Which is the correct sentence "Be quiet, cannot you?" or "Be quiet, can't you?".

    Is it the contraction for can + not, canno't?

    Please explain your answer clearly, it's a little mix in my mind.

    Thank for your reply.

    The French.
    I'm not a teacher ... but, I really think neither of these is correct.

    I'd say, "Be quiet, won't you?"

    ... but maybe that's just me.

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    #10

    Re: Can't or cannot ?

    Hello,

    I read you answer, but are you born in USA or do you really think that these replies are wrong?

    I would like to know the grammar structure, the habits of telling that differe from one to another countries.

    Have a nice day.

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