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    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #1

    They've gone to Spain for two weeks

    I can't understand the blue part of what Quirk's Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language says:

    Because of its resultative meaning, the simple perfective cannot be used with accomplishment verbs when the clause contains an adverbial of duration:
    They've been repairing the road for months.
    *They've repaired the road for months.

    An exception to this, however, occurs where the duration adverbial applies to the resultative state itself or where the clause is negative:
    They've gone to Spain for two weeks.
    They haven't repaired the road for years.

    My question is:
    Does the sentence 'They've gone to Spain for two weeks' mean 'They have started off to Spain and have been away for two weeks' or 'They have gone to Spain with the purpose of staying there for two weeks' or anything?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: They've gone to Spain for two weeks

    It means:
    'They have gone to Spain with the purpose of staying there/will be away for two weeks'

    Why do grammar books have to use such complicated expressions as "resultative meaning/state"? Do they imagine they don't sound 'authoritative' unless they use such 'scholarly' phrasing?

    My sympathies are with you, joham, wading through all that! Can't you find a simpler text?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #3

    Re: They've gone to Spain for two weeks

    CGEL is a joyride compared to this:

    Aspect and predication: the ... - Google Books

    horror

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: They've gone to Spain for two weeks

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    It means:
    'They have gone to Spain with the purpose of staying there/will be away for two weeks'

    Why do grammar books have to use such complicated expressions as "resultative meaning/state"? Do they imagine they don't sound 'authoritative' unless they use such 'scholarly' phrasing?

    My sympathies are with you, joham, wading through all that! Can't you find a simpler text?
    Thank you so much, David L. I'm interested in English grammar, and I've read some grammar books with simpler text, like Martin Hewings' Advanced Grammar in Use. And I'm also interested in many example sentences in Quirk's Grammar, although the text is sometimes a bit difficult. That's why I was here, and have got your kindly help. Thank you again.

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