a joke that turns you off

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blacknomi

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Hi, teachers,

If someone tells you a joke, you are supposed to laught out loud. Sadly, you just couldn't because the joke itself is not fun at all or it is fun but your way of delivery is completely a disaster. How can I say to response this embarrassing silence?


Lame? Cheezy?

BAD joke (a mocking response to the joke). ha-HA :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Hi, teachers,

If someone tells you a joke, you are supposed to laught out loud. Sadly, you just couldn't because the joke itself is not fun at all or it is fun but your way of delivery is completely a disaster. How can I say to response this embarrassing silence?


Lame? Cheezy?

BAD joke (a mocking response to the joke). ha-HA :wink:

Are you the teller or the listener. Sometimes the listeners just groan. Sometimes the teller says: I guess you had to be there. :wink:
 

blacknomi

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Re:
  • I guess you had to be there.

Suppose I am the teller,
Is it similar as "Can I eat my words?" or "Can I take it back?"

I've heard one of my frineds who's from LA said "Lame" and "Cheezy".
He said "lame" is a bit cruel and rude, can be used between close friends. "Cheezy" is an OK term for widely use. Isn't that right?
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Re:
  • I guess you had to be there.

Suppose I am the teller,
Is it similar as "Can I eat my words?" or "Can I take it back?"

I've heard one of my frineds who's from LA said "Lame" and "Cheezy".
He said "lame" is a bit cruel and rude, can be used between close friends. "Cheezy" is an OK term for widely use. Isn't that right?

Cheezy is a bit kinder than lame.

"I guess you had to be there" means that even though I thought this story/joke was very interesting/funny, but you don't seem to think so. If you had heard it when I did, you would have liked it.

I wouldn't use "eat my words" or "take it back" in this context.
 

blacknomi

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I need to check my comprehension again to make sure I get you there.



1. I can use "cheezy" or "lame" to describe a bad joke, whether the joke it self or the way of delivery. From your previous post, you mentioned that "cheezy" is a bit kinder than "lame", thus I infer a conclusion from your lines that I'd better use them when I'm talking to my friends, not to strangers or to nodding acquaintances, because it is considered a bit rude and impolite. Is that right?


2. I am thinking that if I response with "cheezy" or "lame" as a lister to the teller, perhaps it mitigates the embarrassing moment after the joke being delivered. Besides, it might boost more real laughter.
On the other hand, if I use "I guess you had to be there." as my reply after the bad joke, then, how did it come out? Well...I hope you understand my words. <upset! Bad English :oops: > Lets' say, uhm, how would the teller or listener react after I use cheezy, lame or "I guess you had to be there" as a reply? <even more upset now. :? >


3. Thanks for the patience. :oops:
 

Tdol

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Cheesy (BE spelling) would mean cheap to me, though it might raise a smile, whereas lame would not be funny.
 
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Susie Smith

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tdol said:
Cheesy (BE spelling) would mean cheap to me, though it might raise a smile, whereas lame would not be funny.

I believe that cheesy is the AE spelling, too. It can mean cheap, shoddy, of poor quality.
:D
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
I need to check my comprehension again to make sure I get you there.



1. I can use "cheezy" or "lame" to describe a bad joke, whether the joke it self or the way of delivery. From your previous post, you mentioned that "cheezy" is a bit kinder than "lame", thus I infer a conclusion from your lines that I'd better use them when I'm talking to my friends, not to strangers or to nodding acquaintances, because it is considered a bit rude and impolite. Is that right?

That is correct.

2. I am thinking that if I response with "cheezy" or "lame" as a lister to the teller, perhaps it mitigates the embarrassing moment after the joke being delivered. Besides, it might boost more real laughter.
On the other hand, if I use "I guess you had to be there." as my reply after the bad joke, then, how did it come out? Well...I hope you understand my words. <upset! Bad English :oops: > Lets' say, uhm, how would the teller or listener react after I use cheezy, lame or "I guess you had to be there" as a reply? <even more upset now. :? >

The reaction would depend on the person. "I guess you had to be there" is sarcastic from the listener; somewhat apologetic from the speaker.

3. Thanks for the patience. :oops:

That's the easy part with you. :D :D :D :D
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Now I see.
Million thanks, Dear Mike. :angel:

:lilangel:
 
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