A lot of

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jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why?

1. That is a lot of apply juice you are buying.
2. That is a lot of corn you are buying.
3. That is a lot of corns you are buying. (If this is incorrect, how can I correct this?)
4. That are a lot of corns you are buying.
5. Those are a lot of corns you are buying.
6. That is a lot of dishes you have to wash.
7. That is a lot of dish you have to wash. (Is this incorrect? It doesn't sound right.)
8. Those are a lot of dish you have to wash.
9. Those are a lot of dishes you have to wash.

What is the difference in meaing between these two?
10. That is a lot of corn you are buying.
11. Those are a lot of corns you are buying.

Is #12 incorrect?
12. There isn't a lot of people in this server.
13. There aren't a lot of people in this server.
 

Casiopea

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1. That is a lot of apple juice you are buying. :D
2. That is a lot of corn you are buying. :D
3. That is a lot of corns you are buying.

Note that, corn is non-count.

4. That are a lot of corns you are buying. :(
5. Those are a lot of corns you are buying. :(
6. That is a lot of dishes you have to wash. :(
7. That is a lot of dish you have to wash. :(
8. Those are a lot of dish you have to wash. :(
9. Those are a lot of dishes you have to wash. :D

Note that, the subject 'That' is singular, so it takes a singular verb:

That is a lot of dishes.

If the subject is plural, then the verb, too, is plural:

Those are a lot of dishes.

10. That is a lot of corn you are buying. :D
11. Those are a lot of corns you are buying. :(

Note that, 'corn' is non-count and that the structure is a linking structure:

Those = corn (Count, Plural = Non-count, Plural) Not OK

'Those' and 'corn' are not compatible, but 'Those' and 'corn cans' are compatible:

Those are a lot of corn cans.
Those = cans (Count, Plural = Count, Plural) OK

12. There isn't a lot of people in this server. :(
13. There aren't a lot of people in this server. :D

Note that, 'people' is a Count noun:

One person; Two people.

All the best, :D
 

Casiopea

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shane said:
Casiopea said:
3. That is a lot of corns you are buying.

Note that, corn is non-count.


'My, that is a lot of corns you have on your foot!' :lol:

Context!

You had to pad it, huh? :lol:

At least let jack know that Count corn/corns refers to a small, tender area of horny-skin on the toe.

Hey, that's not my wordage. It's Oxfords. :lol:
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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In the first, the action is being considered as a whole, not individual cases. In the second, the number of individual deaths is being considered. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
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Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean?

When would I use this?
1. There is a lot of car over there.

And when would I use this?
2. There are a lot of cars over there.

How do I know which one to use? Does it matter?
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
What do these mean?

When would I use this?
1. There is a lot of car over there.

And when would I use this?
2. There are a lot of cars over there.

How do I know which one to use? Does it matter?

1. is incorrect. 'car' is a count noun so it needs to be plural, as in 2.

Here's how you know which one to use:
There is a lot of money, fish, traffic, milk, etc. (non-count)
There are a lot of cars, books, pencils, people, etc. (count)

Exception
There's a lot of books.... (OK; informal)

A singular verb is often used in contracted forms: Contracyed "There's (a lot of books)" is OK, but "There is (a lot of books)" is odd. The reason a singular verb is used with a plural subject has to do with ease of speech. "There's" is way easier to pronounce than "There're". Give it a try! :D
 
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