a medical term

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NearThere

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I find it hard to explain. I'm looking for a word that explains an illness in ways that tell how it affects the body, how the illness behaves in human body (?!).......Does anyone understand what I'm getting at?

Let's say you're with the doctor who just gave a diagnose of a disease, let's say lukemia, that you know the basic picture of the disease. But you want to know exactly how Lukemia works in you body, the cause and effect, etc. information that a medical student would obtain. And I would like to just ask it in one simple question instead of edging for more information. Like this:

Could you explain (or give) the ________ of the illness?

Many thanks

NT
 

Neillythere

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Hi NT

The nearest I could suggest immediately would be "implications" i.e. what does it mean is going to happen to me.

Is this what you were looking for?

PS Forgive me for ending a sentence with a preposition, as "a preposition is the wrong word to end a sentence with":oops:
 
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banderas

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I find it hard to explain. I'm looking for a word that explains an illness in ways that tell how it affects the body, how the illness behaves in human body (?!).......Does anyone understand what I'm getting at?

Let's say you're with the doctor who just gave a diagnose of a disease, let's say lukemia, that you know the basic picture of the disease. But you want to know exactly how Lukemia works in you body, the cause and effect, etc. information that a medical student would obtain. And I would like to just ask it in one simple question instead of edging for more information. Like this:

Could you explain to me the specifics of the illness?

Many thanks

NT
this is my suggestion.;-)
 

banderas

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Hi NT

The nearest I could suggest immediately would be "implications" i.e. what does it mean is going to happen to me.

Is this what you were looking for?

PS Forgive me for ending a sentence with a preposition, as "a preposition is the wring word to end a sentence with":oops:

Hi Neillythere,
are you serious by saying that in bold?:roll:
 

susiedqq

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How about: manifest (reveals)

The disease manifests itself with a rash, fever, low blood count . . . .
 

Neillythere

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Yes, Banderas.

It used to be a way of remembering not to end a sentence with a preposition, which was severely frowned on in my school days (albeit a very long time ago!)
 

banderas

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Yes, Banderas.

It used to be a way of remembering not to end a sentence with a preposition, which was severely frowned on in my school days (albeit a very long time ago!)
why was that?:roll:
 

NearThere

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Thank you very much, folks.

These are good suggestions. And I'm sure if I use any of those I'd get around to where I want to go. Forgive me for being a persistent ass, but I want to ask in a way that a doctor would explain how the blood, cells, organs function under the influence of the illness and the localities in your body that the illness affects and so forth......I'm looking for a very specific medical term. The term in Chinese, if transliterated, would mean something like "sickness' principles", "sickness' logics" or "sickness' reasoning" (this one totally doesn't make sense)........is anyone getting my drift? I'm assuming it's a word that's more likely ends with "___gy". Geez, this is hard for me to explain.

Thanks for trying people.

NT
 

NearThere

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Hi NT
PS Forgive me for ending a sentence with a preposition, as "a preposition is the wrong word to end a sentence with":oops:

Like I'd have the impulse to draw a gun and start shooting in the general direction where you are?:-D

I end my sentence with whatever, I'm the least particular with the position of a preposition. Number one offender --NearThere.;-)
 

Neillythere

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Aha!

Although not a teacher or a doctor, I believe the word you are looking for is "pathology"?

AskOxford: pathology

pathology

noun 1 the branch of medicine concerned with the causes and effects of diseases. 2 the typical behaviour of a disease.
 

Neillythere

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Hi Banderas

Unfortunately :roll:, my secondary education was at a "Grammar School".
They frowned on what they believed to be bad grammar! :)
 

Neillythere

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Hey folks, I found a reference for the preposition situation:

Prepositions: Locators in Time and Place

You may have learned that ending a sentence with a preposition is a serious breach of grammatical etiquette. It doesn't take a grammarian to spot a sentence-ending preposition, so this is an easy rule to get caught up on (!). Although it is often easy to remedy the offending preposition, sometimes it isn't, and repair efforts sometimes result in a clumsy sentence. "Indicate the book you are quoting from" is not greatly improved with "Indicate from which book you are quoting."

Based on shaky historical precedent, the rule itself is a latecomer to the rules of writing. Those who dislike the rule are fond of recalling Churchill's rejoinder: "That is nonsense up with which I shall not put." We should also remember the child's complaint: "What did you bring that book that I don't like to be read to out of up for?"
 

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The "-gy" word you're looking for could be pathology - pathology refers to a disorder, and histology refers to tissue in general (even when there's nothing wrong with it); I think there's another word in that area - but ending "-geny" - I can't call it to mind at the moment. If the doctors want to refer to the way the disorder's development will affect the patient, they refer to the "prognosis" (as distinct from the diagnosis, which is when they work out what's wrong.)

To answer banderas' question (sorry if someone else has already - I'm skimming this thread) there was an old prescription against using a preposition to end a sentence with. If a teacher tries to pass it on, point out (as Churchill - a Nobel laureate for literature - did) that "this is the sort of interference up with which you will not put" - his point being that in English, especially in the case of phrasal verbs like 'put up with', it can be unnatural and unclear to distort the grammar so that it fits a paradigm that applied to Latin (necessarily, because a preposition can't go at the end of anything in Latin - if it did, it'd be called a "postposition"). Apologies in advance for ruffling any feathers, but in cases like this I feel one should call a spade a spade (if not, to use Shakespeare's phrase) "a bloody shovel";-))

b
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher

Hi NearThere,

There is my two cents contribution:

etiology - the assigning of causes. Hence, the chain of causes leading up to an event, particularly in medical science.

Etiology (alternately aetiology, aitiology) is the study of causation. Derived from the Greek αίτιολογία, "giving a reason for".

Pertaining to etiology.
  • e. diagnosis — the name of a disease which includes the identification of the causative agent, e.g. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis.
  • e. factors — risk factors contributing to the cause of a disease.
In medicine in particular, the term refers to the causes of diseases or pathologies. Some diseases, such as diabetes, are syndromically defined by their signs and symptoms, but include more than one condition, and therefore can have more than one etiology.

Regards.

V.
 

Neillythere

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NearThere

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Aha!

Although not a teacher or a doctor, I believe the word you are looking for is "pathology"?

AskOxford: pathology

pathology

noun 1 the branch of medicine concerned with the causes and effects of diseases. 2 the typical behaviour of a disease.

Fantastica!

I think that's it!

No, I would most likely not use it in a colliqual (spelling please?) English, that would be, what's the word again, pretentious?

Thank you! I owe you big.

NT
 

NearThere

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Based on shaky historical precedent, the rule itself is a latecomer to the rules of writing. Those who dislike the rule are fond of recalling Churchill's rejoinder: "That is nonsense up with which I shall not put." We should also remember the child's complaint: "What did you bring that book that I don't like to be read to out of up for?"

Churchill and I would have been great friends.

Just have to get that out.

NT
 
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