a sentence

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jasonlulu_2000

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"Dodos did-did but they don't-don't anymore."

What does this strange sentence mean?

Jason
 
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Route21

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It's a play on words.

The dodo is an extinct bird, immortalised in the saying: "as dead as a dodo".
Whatever a dodo could do, when they were alive, they can't do now.
Hence:

"Whatever a Do-do did-did they don't-don't anymore."

Hope this helps
R21
 

emsr2d2

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I'm pretty sure it's supposed to read "Whatever a dodo did do, they don't do any more".
 

5jj

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I'm pretty sure it's supposed to read "Whatever a dodo did do, they don't do any more".
I'm pretty sur it's not. As R21 said,it's a play on words. It is supposed to be a humorous way of conveying the message you suggest.

My own pathetic attempt at similar humour (?) would be:

Can-can Toulouse-Lautrec can-can?
Of course he can't-can't - he's dead.
 
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