A simple question for native speakers

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blacknomi

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Hello, non-natives' opinions are welcomed as well, please don't hesitate to share with me. :-D

I read a comment in a thick crazy book called "A grammar of contemporary English".


PHP:
Some speakers feel that "Either you or I are going" is more natural than "Eithet you or I am going."

I'd like to know your opinion!
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
"Either you or I are going" is more natural than "Either you or I am going."
They both sound strange to me. I prefer:

Either you are going or I am going.
Either you or I will go.
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
They both sound strange to me. I prefer:

Either you are going or I am going.
Either you or I will go.
Really? Hm with "will", there's no problem left.

What about

"Either you or I am right" or "Either you or I are right", which one do you prefer? Could it be possible that some native speakers would like to use the second one?



Best Regards,
Blacknomi :-D
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
Really? Hm with "will", there's no problem left.
That's right. Uhm, is there suppose to be a problem? Eee.


blacknomi said:
"Either you or I am right" or "Either you or I are right", which one do you prefer? Could it be possible that some native speakers would like to use the second one?
If I had to choose one, I'd pick "Either...I am....". The reason being, 'I' and 'am' are within close proximity, whereas 'You' and 'are' are not. But again, under normal circumstances, I wouldn't say either of them.
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
But again, under normal circumstances, I wouldn't say either of them.
Thank you, Ms. Beauty in Japan.

I'm a bit surprised at the tone you had, "But again....", while we have plenty of those tests oand excercises that ask learners to choose either am or are. If so, under normal circumstances, you wouldn't say either. Then I would like to know what you as any native speaker would say.

Either you are right or I am right.
Which one do you say often, "Either you or I will go." or "Either you are going or I am going."


I look forward to your answer, as always.



All the best,
Blacknomi :-D
 

twostep

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Which one do you say often, "Either you or I will go." or "Either you are going or I am going."


Without thinking I would use "either you or I will go". "Either you are going or I am going" has the sound of command or ultimatum to it.
 

blacknomi

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twostep said:
Without thinking I would use "either you or I will go". "Either you are going or I am going" has the sound of command or ultimatum to it.

Twostep,
If you say, "Either you or I will go" then will you utter, "Either you or I am right!"
 

blacknomi

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Did you see numbers at the right side of each post?

#6 in Deutsch, Zahlen sechs! :-D I just picked my Moment mal! Lehrbuch 1.

ho ho ho ( Santa Clause is coming to town) I miss susie_smith now. :-(
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
I'm a bit surprised at the tone you had ...
My tone was "Eee" (One says, "Eee" when they see a mouse or a cockroach). I was scared when I found out that I had to find a problem. :-(

I use both, "Either you or I will go" and "Either you are going or I am going".
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
Eweeeee...I see. :lol:

A li ga do, Cassie sensie! @->--
Dou-i-ta-shi-ma-shi-te (You're welcome). :-D

Psst. Japanese doesn't have [li], Try, a-[ri]-ga-tou. :up:

Also, try Dou-mo (i.e., Thanks). It's shorter and colloquial. :-D It used to be considered Men's speech, but these days women use it, too. Things are a changin' in Japan. :up: :shock: :cool:
 

blacknomi

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Sensei, yen-ki-de-su-ga?!

Dou-mo! :-D :-D :-D :-D :-D ( I'm a man!)

I wish I had time to learn Japanese. How long have you learned it? :up:

One Japanese friend finds my name, Sabrina, difficult to pornounce. So she called me sha-ba-sha-bu. :lol:
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
Sensei, gen-ki-de-su-ga?!
genki desu ga... (Psst. The above question is asked when someone has (a) been in the hospital and is now out or (b) has or had a cold or an illness. So my response, genki desu ga... means, Yes, I'm feeling energetic/better/up to par, but....

blacknomi said:
Dou-mo! :-D :-D :-D :-D :-D ( I'm a man!)
You are, really? or are you just pretending to be by using Men's speech? :shock:

blacknomi said:
I wish I had time to learn Japanese. How long have you learned it? :up:
Going on 5 years, and it's a difficult language to acquire, for two reasons: xenophobia ('xeno' stranger, 'phobia' fear) and 'silence is golden' being a cultural norm! That is, you sort of have to be very good friends with someone before they feel comfortable enough to speak beyond the so-called niceties, so in general, it's hard to (a) practice and (b) pick up usages.

In my opinion, Japan is a case study waiting to happen re: JSL learners in a JFL environment. One of the main problems EFL learners face is not having the opportunity to be situated in a native English language environment. ESL learners, though, tend to pick up the language much more quickly because they have opportunity. In Japan, however, and even though I am situated in a native Japanese language environment, I feel like an JFL learner because the opportunity to use Japanese is limited to greetings, speak when spoken to, do not offend: do not ask questions the answers to which the listener does not know (hahaha, which is kind of funny in a way because a conversation has to be about what the other person knows. That is, you need to know if the person will know the answer before you even ask the question. Given that limitation on topics, a conversation is usually about the weather or something insanely odd like, what's your favorite ____?. I tell ya, I am fluent in that area! :lol: If you do happen to ask a question the answer to which the listener does not know, you'll be standing there waiting for a reply that won't be forthcoming, because if one answers what one doesn't know it may get one in trouble. You see, silence is golden. :lol:

blacknomi said:
One Japanese friend finds my name, Sabrina, difficult to pornounce. So she called me sha-ba-sha-bu. :lol:
That's the coolest pronunciation! Where I live, in Shizuoka, the Mt Fuji prefecture, your name would be pronounced Sha-bu-ri-na. :-D

I love Japanese. :up: :up:
 

blacknomi

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genki desu ga... (Psst. The above question is asked when someone has (a) been in the hospital and is now out or (b) has or had a cold or an illness. So my response, genki desu ga... means, Yes, I'm feeling energetic/better/up to par, but....
Really?! I don't think so and I could be wrong. It should be a catchy phrase because I see it on TV all the time. Isn't it a greeting?



Casiopea said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacknomi
Dou-mo! :-D :-D :-D :-D :-D ( I'm a man!)

You are, really? or are you just pretending to be by using Men's speech?
Hehe, trust your extra-sensory perception. :-D

xenophobia ('xeno' stranger, 'phobia' fear) and 'silence is golden' being a cultural norm!
How long have you been staying there? If you have lived a long time, you wouldn't have a feeling of xenophobia? Or you mean they have a feeling of xenophobia? It's interesting that you have to know how to ask them a question that you know they know how to answer! ( What a tongue twister I'm writing. Does that make sense at all? I doubt:cool: ) Hm, if silence is golden is true, I assume they must be filthy rich. hehe


I know a pretty cool friend who lives in TN, Nashville. He loves Chinese SO much because of religion factor. He has a lot of chances to practise his Chinese. He knows quite a lot Chinese characters, simplified or traditional. I would like to know the reason you love Japanese. You like to be a Ninja or raw fish? :lol: Take your time replying. UE has busy business now. Thank you very much for your contributions here.



Luv ya! :up: :up: :up: :up: :up:





Yours,
Sha-bu-ri-na
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
How long have you been staying there? If you have lived a long time, you wouldn't have a feeling of xenophobia? Or you mean they have a feeling of xenophobia?


It's been 5 years now. :up:
I am not xenophobic. :lol: :shock: :lol:
I am Canadian. :lol: Canada is housed with odds and ends, as is America. That's what makes us multi-cultural. I dare say two Canadians look alike. :roll: :lol: I am no more afraid of difference than I am of wearing two different socks to work. :lol: They're comfortable, even if they don't match.:up:
 
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