A twining agreement

Bassim

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I have tried to use a "twining agreement" in a sentence. Would you please correct my mistakes?

The majors and London and Sofia signed a twinning agreement, which they expect would improve relations between two capitals in all areas, from economy to arts, sports and science.
 
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jutfrank

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There's a lot wrong here. Most of all the spelling of twinning.
 

Bassim

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Yes,
Unfortunately, I missed that too. I must have been very tired when I wrote my sentence.
 

Bassim

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I will repeat my sentence.

The mayors of London and Sofia signed a twinning agreement, which they expect will improve relations between the two capitals in all areas, from economy to arts, sports and science.
 

Bassim

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I read in a Bosnian news site that the mayors of Doha and Sarajevo signed a twinning agreement today, but I was not sure how to formulate that sentence in English, and therefore I tried to write my own sentence just to see if it sounds natural in English.
 
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Charlie Bernstein

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It's not American English, so I looked it up. As I suspected, it's what we call a sister cities agreement. I don't know what the British call it.
 

Rover_KE

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... or 'town twinning (agreement)'.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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One wonders what the ultimate objective is. I found a word today that I'd like to use in a sentence: "honorificabilitudinitatibus". Can you help me? If not, how about "antidisestablishmentarianism"?
So far, I've never been able to work demisemihemidemisemiquaver or floccinaucinhilipification into a sentence.

Until now.
 

Barb_D

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Someone has found a new word/phrase, and wants to make sure they understand it by using it in a sentence.

While it's useful to tell someone that a word/phrase is fairly uncommon in our everyday use of the language, I don't see why we should be making fun of the practice of trying it out in a new sentence.
 

Rover_KE

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So far, I've never been able to work demisemihemidemisemiquaver ... into a sentence.

Until now.
I think you'll find that's hemidemisemiquaver.

84px-Hemidemisemiquaver.svg.png
 

GoesStation

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So far, I've never been able to work demisemihemidemisemiquaver or floccinaucinhilipification into a sentence.
Musicians in Britain occasionally use the first one. Americans call that a two-hundred and fifty-sixth note,​ usually written as a 256[SUP]th[/SUP] note.
 

emsr2d2

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I'm grateful that in all my years playing musical instruments and singing, I have never had to deal with anything shorter than a hemidemisemiquaver!
 

GoesStation

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I think you'll find that's hemidemisemiquaver.

84px-Hemidemisemiquaver.svg.png
[EDIT]That is indeed a hemidemisemiquaver (a 64[SUP]th[/SUP] note in AmE). You need two more beams for a 256[SUP]th[/SUP] note.
 
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GoesStation

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Antidisestablishmentarianism

I was immensely gratified years ago when I opened the Letters pages of The Economist and found Antidisestablishmentarianism as the sub-head over a letter. The newspaper (whose publishers have yet to accede to the modern trend of calling such journals "magazines") has kept up its proud tradition as recently as last September.
 
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