A Word to the Wise

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Anonymous

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What are your favorite proverbs and expressions of wisdom?

If English is not your first language, then tell us a proverb in your own language. Translate it to English. We'll tell you if your translation is grammatically correct.

Please list one proverb at a time. If you want to, tell us why you like this proverb and why it is a favorite of yours.


<Edited because: I left out a word.
 

MikeNewYork

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TALKtown said:
What are your favorite proverbs and expressions of wisdom?

If English is not your first language, then tell us a proverb in your own language. Translate it to English. We'll tell you if your translation is grammatically correct.

Please list one proverb at a time. If you want to, tell us why you like this proverb and why it is a favorite of yours.


"No good deed goes unpunished." +|:)
 

Tdol

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Twixt stirrup and ground, mercy he sought and mercy he found.
 
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What are your favorite proverbs and expressions of wisdom?

One thing is confusing here... :?
what is the difference b/w Proverb and Idioms.
Actually in urdu we have 3 different types of words/phrases named "Zarbul misal", "Mahawaray" and "Kahawatay".

If i am not wrong,

"A friend in need is a friend indeed" is a expression of wisdom
"To blow onc's own trumpet" is a Idiom

Expression of Wisdom= "Kahawatay"
Proverb=Mahawaray or may be Zarbul misal...
Little confuse about it.
 
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ozron1

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Around the rugged rock, the ragged rascal ran. (An object lesson in the dangers of obsessive behaviour)

The quick brown fox jumped over the.....thingie. ( But, WHY?)

Now is the time, the walrus said, etc etc etc. (An excellent DMC starter)

To sit in solemn silence in a dull, dark dock
In a pestilential prison with a life-long lock
Awaiting the sensation of a short, sharp shock
From a cheap and chippy chopper on a big, black block. (Wakes up the mouth and avoids thibilanth problemth)

Aye..., two, Brutus. (Excellent for ordering beers in a crowded bar)

Able was I ere I saw Elba. (Dunno, except it seems to indicate a penile erection problem)

Never under-estimate the intelligence of Fred and Freda Fewclothes. (A timely warning for those addressing the Fewclothes family)
 
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ProudToBeMuslim said:
He who have taught me a single word made me his slave..

I translated it in English. :)


I would write it in English this way: It was he who taught me a word that made me his slave.

or-

He that teaches me a word makes me his slave.


:) 8)
 

Tdol

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You could say
(He) Who has taught me a word has made me his slave.
 
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Anonymous

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tdol said:
You could say
(He) Who has taught me a word has made me his slave.

That's definitely better. How about putting it in the present?

He who teaches me a word makes me his slave.
 

Tdol

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"A word to the wise guy" William Burroughs :evil:
 

Tdol

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PS from the point of view of proverbs, your suggestion makes it much better; the present it is. :lol:
 

Tdol

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Patience is a virtue.


BTW, is that the 'road to success'? :)
 
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tdol said:
PS from the point of view of proverbs, your suggestion makes it much better; the present it is. :lol:

Quite, though I wasn't trying to better your suggestion. I was just making another.

:D 8)
 
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gwendolinest

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ProudToBeMuslim said:
Lion's one day life is better than 100 years life of Wolf.

One day of a lion’s life is better than than 100 years of a wolf’s (life).

:)Fade-col:)
 

MikeNewYork

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ProudToBeMuslim said:
Here it is another one.

Lion's one day life is better than 100 years life of Wolf.

That is a strange proverb, Proud.

Both animals are predators and hunt in packs. It would seem that one of the animals should be prey in that proverb.
 
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MikeNewYork said:
ProudToBeMuslim said:
Here it is another one.

Lion's one day life is better than 100 years life of Wolf.

That is a strange proverb, Proud.

Both animals are predators and hunt in packs. It would seem that one of the animals should be prey in that proverb.


Ok I'll try to explain it , but you have to wait because first I think how to explain it then i'll put my thoughts into English word. :)
 
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