adding ed

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jack

Senior Member
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Apr 24, 2004
Casiopea said:
I agree.

1. I remember (now) that I bought this car 5 years ago. :D
2. I just then remembered that I (had) bought this car 5 years ago. :D

(had) is optional.


okay, so we use "remember" in this case for past/present tense correct?
and "bought" functions as a participle? How do you know which one is the participle in other sentences? How can i tell if "bought" is the participle?
 

Francois

Senior Member
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Jun 15, 2004
You use 'remember' in the correct tense, that is, present if you remember now, past simple if you remembered in a given point in the past, or even the perfect tenses if you want...
Then you add the clause describing what you've remembered, again in the suitable tense.

Eg. You bought a car five years ago. You remember that you bought a car five years ago. Maybe it was yesterday that you remembered that you bought a car five years ago. But you may also remember that you had bought your son a car before that. You were planning to buy a new car, but hopefully you have remembered that you had bought one not long ago.

FRC
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Casiopea said:
I agree.

1. I remember (now) that I bought this car 5 years ago. :D
2. I just then remembered that I (had) bought this car 5 years ago. :D

(had) is optional.

Can you explain to me again about what is the difference between the two above? thanks



"I still remember that I went out to eat at that place." <--correct?
"I still remembered that I went out to eat at that place." <--correct?
What is the difference between the two above?



"I still remember that I had went out to eat at that place." <--correct?
"I still remember that I have went out to eat at that place." <---correct?
What is the difference between the two above?


"I still remembered that I had went out to eat at that place."<--correct?
"I still remembered that I have went out to eat at that place." <--corrrct?
What is the difference between the two above?


Do i use "had" with "remembered"
and
"have" with "remember"??
How do i know which one to use?
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"If life were like that, you wouldn't need a master card." <--correct?
"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card." <--correct?

What does these two sentences mean?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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The first is correct, the second is not. The first means that we need a Mastercard because life isn't the way we want it to be and we need credit. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
tdol said:
The first is correct, the second is not. The first means that we need a Mastercard because life isn't the way we want it to be and we need credit. ;-)

"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card."

Can you explain to me about the meaning of this sentence too? Why is it incorrect?



"If I applied for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--correct? what does this question mean?
"If I apply for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--incorrect? why? what does this question mean?


"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
"If he killed him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
tdol said:
The first is correct, the second is not. The first means that we need a Mastercard because life isn't the way we want it to be and we need credit. ;-)

"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card."

Can you explain to me about the meaning of this sentence too? Why is it incorrect?



"If I applied for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--correct? what does this question mean?
"If I apply for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--incorrect? why? what does this question mean?


"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
"If he killed him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
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Member Type
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British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
jack said:
tdol said:
The first is correct, the second is not. The first means that we need a Mastercard because life isn't the way we want it to be and we need credit. ;-)

"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card."

Can you explain to me about the meaning of this sentence too? Why is it incorrect?

The first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary- the two don't go together.



jack said:
"If I applied for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--correct? what does this question mean?
"If I apply for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--incorrect? why? what does this question mean?

They are both correct- the difference is how likely you are to apply. The second is where you are playing with the idea, but the first suggests you are thinking seriously.


jack said:
"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
"If he killed him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?

The first is incorrect- it should be 'kills'. It means that the person is considering murder quite seriously. The second is correct, but doesn't suggest that there any real plans to kill.

;-)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
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Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
jack said:
tdol said:
The first is correct, the second is not. The first means that we need a Mastercard because life isn't the way we want it to be and we need credit. ;-)

"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card."

Can you explain to me about the meaning of this sentence too? Why is it incorrect?

The first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary- the two don't go together.



jack said:
"If I applied for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--correct? what does this question mean?
"If I apply for that place, should I go and ask to speak to the manager?" <--incorrect? why? what does this question mean?

They are both correct- the difference is how likely you are to apply. The second is where you are playing with the idea, but the first suggests you are thinking seriously.


jack said:
"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?
"If he killed him, he would go to jail." <--correct? what does it mean?

The first is incorrect- it should be 'kills'. It means that the person is considering murder quite seriously. The second is correct, but doesn't suggest that there any real plans to kill.

;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks. :)
Sorry about that I keep asking the same concept of the sentence formation over and over again, but I am working on it. I'll will try to minimize it and make your time more productive.


"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card." <--incorrect
The first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary- the two don't go together. I get how the first part is something real, but how do you know that the second part is imaginary?

"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--why isn't this incorrect? Doesnt the first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary? How do you know?
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks. :)
Sorry about that I keep asking the same concept of the sentence formation over and over again, but I am working on it. I'll will try to minimize it and make your time more productive.


"If life is like that, you wouldn't need a master card." <--incorrect
The first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary- the two don't go together. I get how the first part is something real, but how do you know that the second part is imaginary?

"If he kills him, he would go to jail." <--why isn't this incorrect? Doesnt the first describes something real and the second describes something imaginary? How do you know?
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
If he kills him, he would go to jail
Shouldn't one say 'if he kills him, he will go to jail" ?

FRC

You would go to jail if you killed him.
You will (definitely) go to jail if you kill him.

He would (definitely) go to jail if he kills him. (Sounds odd but acceptable to my ears.) :oops:
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
If he kills him, he would go to jail
Shouldn't one say 'if he kills him, he will go to jail" ?

FRC

You would go to jail if you killed him.
You will (definitely) go to jail if you kill him.

He would (definitely) go to jail if he kills him. (Sounds odd but acceptable to my ears.) :oops:
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
You never looked at him. <--correct?
You never look at him. <--correct?

Both are correct. looked is past, look is present, and it expresses a fact.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Casiopea said:
jack said:
Is he banned? <--correct?
Is he ban? <--incorrect?

Which one do you think is correct and why? :D

Both of them are correct.


"I use to sleep here." <--What does this mean, I don't really get it?
"I used to sleep here." <--This means, he was living there before?
Both of these are correct right?
 
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