adding -ing

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean?

1. I think working sucks. (What is the subject and verb? Is 'working' the subject? What about the verb?)
2. I thinking working suck. (Is 'working' singular? Is anything with -ing singular?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
1. I (Subject) think (Verb) working sucks (Object). :D

Structure: Subject+Verb+Object
=> The Object is a clause. 'working' is the Subject, 'sucks' is the verb. Note, 'working' functions as a noun, a gerund.

2. I thinking working suck. :(

Structure: Subject+Present Participle+Object
=> There is no Verb.

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
2. I thinking working suck. (Is 'working' singular? Is anything with -ing singular?

How do you know if 'working' is singular or plural?

Are these correct? If not, why?
1. You need to return your printer cable.
2. You need to returning your printing cable.

3. You need to return your printer's cable.
4. You need to return your printers' cable. (Is this incorrect? Is it b/c you have more then one printer which makes sense to have more then one cable?)
5. You need to return your printers' cables.
6. You need to return your printers cables. ( I am trying to say you have more then one printer and you need to return those cables. Is this correct?)
7. You need to return your printers cable. (What does this mean?)
8. You need to return your printer cables. (What does this mean?)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
2. I thinking working suck. (Is 'working' singular? Is anything with -ing singular?

How do you know if 'working' is singular or plural?

'working' looks like a verb because it ends in -ing, but it's not a verb. It's a participle, specifically a present participle. Words that end in -ing that function as objects or subjects are nouns, and they are called gerunds. 'working' is a gerund. We know that because we can test it by using "What?":

Q: What sucks?
A: Working. (Noun, singular)

The word 'working' is a noun, a gerund, and it's singular in that context. We know it's singular because it doesn't have -s. Here's an example of a plural gerund:

The workings of you mind are cool. (Noun, plural)

1. You need to return your printer cable. :D
2. You need to returning your printing cable. :?:
=> 2. means the cable actually does the printing.)
3. You need to return your printer's cable. :D
4. You need to return your printers' cable. :D
=> 4. means, one cable is used for many printers.
5. You need to return your printers' cables. :D
6. You need to return your printers cables. :(
=> adjectives don't take -s, so 'printers' is incorrect.
7. You need to return your printers cable. :(
8. You need to return your printer cables. :D
=> What kind of cables are they? They are for the printer/printers.

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.

You need to return your printers cables.
=> adjectives don't take -s, so 'printers' is incorrect.

Adjectives don't have to end in -ed to be an adjective? How do you know if it is an adjective?

1. Reading makes success.
2. Reading make success. ('reading' is singular right?)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Adjectives don't have to end in -ed to be an adjective?

That's correct. :up:

jack said:
How do you know if it is an adjective?

Simple. Ask the question, "What kind of_____(noun)?"

EX: What kind of car? A fast car. (Adjective)

jack said:
1. Reading makes success.
2. Reading make success. ('reading' is singular right?)

1. is OK. 'makes' is a verb. 2. is not OK. 'make' does not agree in number with its subject. The subject is 'Reading', a verbal noun, or gerund.

How to tell if it's a noun: Ask the question, "What makes success?"

EX: What makes success? Reading makes success.

By the way, try, Reading makes one/a person successful.

The WH-word 'what' represents a noun. :wink:

EX: It's a fast what? It's a fast car. (noun)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top