adding s

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I will make sure no one else will come with me. <---what is the subject in this sentence? is it "I" if so, isnt that singular then? Why dont i add a "s" to come which makes "comes".
 

queenmaabd

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I will make sure no one else will come with me.
This is not a simple sentence. It is compound and therefore there are two verbs and two subjects.

The first verb and subject are I and make sure.

The second verb and subject are no one else and come.

As you know, someone, no one, and anyone are always treated as third person singular, and this it why you have to ad an "s" to the verb come that is in present simple tense.
 

Tdol

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Will + infinitve without 'to'. Therefore we never add the 's' after 'will'. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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queenmaabd said:
I will make sure no one else will come with me.
This is not a simple sentence. It is compound and therefore there are two verbs and two subjects.

The first verb and subject are I and make sure.

The second verb and subject are no one else and come.

As you know, someone, no one, and anyone are always treated as third person singular, and this it why you have to ad an "s" to the verb come that is in present simple tense.

I agree with your explanation, but the sentence is not compound (two independent clauses); it is complex (one independent and one dependent clause). :wink:
 

jack

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Does Simon Fraser University have degrees for Network Enterprise Specialist? <-- is the "degrees" with a "s" correct? If so, what does the sentece mean? Is it saying there is more then one type degree for Network Enterprise Specialist?

or should i say:

Does Simon Fraser University a have degree for Network Enterprise Specialist course?

Does Simon Fraser University have degrees for computer courses? <--Is this more appropriatefor the use of "s"?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
Does Simon Fraser University have degrees for Network Enterprise Specialist? <-- is the "degrees" with a "s" correct? If so, what does the sentece mean? Is it saying there is more then one type degree for Network Enterprise Specialist?

or should i say:

Does Simon Fraser University a have degree for Network Enterprise Specialist course?

Does Simon Fraser University have degrees for computer courses? <--Is this more appropriatefor the use of "s"?

I would use "grant" or "offer" for a degree, not "have". One could use either the singular or the plural for degree. :wink:
 

jack

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"I have a lot of motorcycles picture." <--I know this is incorrect, but why? what does the sentence mean or this just doesn't make sense at all?

"I have a lot of motorcycles pictures." <--I know this is incorrect, but why? what does the sentence mean or this just doesn't make sense at all?

"I have a lot of motorcycle pictures." <--This is what i want to say.
 

jack

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"100% other parties fault."
Why is "parties" not "party"? Is it because "Other" is singular so you add an "S" to party?
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
"I have a lot of motorcycles picture." <--I know this is incorrect, but why? what does the sentence mean or this just doesn't make sense at all?

"I have a lot of motorcycle pictures." <--This is what i want to say.

'motorcycle' functions as an adjective: It tells us what kind of 'pictures. Adjectives do not take -s. Nouns do:

I have three motorcycles. (Noun)
I have three motorcycle pictures. (Adjective)

All the best,
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
"100% other parties fault."
Why is "parties" not "party"? Is it because "Other" is singular so you add an "S" to party?

It's 100% the other party's fault. (OK)
It's 100% the other parties' fault. (OK)

100% of the blame belongs to the other party. (singular)
100% of the blame belongs to the other parties. (plural)

Whose fault?
The other party's fault. (OK)
The other parties' fault. (OK)

All the best,
 

henry

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Casiopea said:
jack said:
"I have a lot of motorcycles picture." <--I know this is incorrect, but why? what does the sentence mean or this just doesn't make sense at all?

"I have a lot of motorcycle pictures." <--This is what i want to say.

'motorcycle' functions as an adjective: It tells us what kind of 'pictures. Adjectives do not take -s. Nouns do:

I have three motorcycles. (Noun)
I have three motorcycle pictures. (Adjective)

All the best,

I am not sure if I've ever heard or seen using 'motorcycle' as an adjective.

IMO, it should be motorcycle(noun)+picture(noun), and if one wants to make plural, the 's' goes then to the second noun(pictures) in such case.
Let's see more examples:

e.g. a motorcycle accident (singular)
motorcycle accidents (plural)

:wink:




[/b]
 

RonBee

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It is common to treat nouns as adjectives, as in your example, motorcycle accident. In that phrase, motorcycle is being used as an adjective.

:)
 

henry

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RonBee said:
It is common to treat nouns as adjectives, as in your example, motorcycle accident. In that phrase, motorcycle is being used as an adjective.

:)

Ooops. I didn't know about that rule before.

Now, I stand corrected.

Thanks a lot, Ron. :D
 

RonBee

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You're welcome.

:D
 

Casiopea

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henry said:
Casiopea said:
jack said:
"I have a lot of motorcycles picture." <--I know this is incorrect, but why? what does the sentence mean or this just doesn't make sense at all?

"I have a lot of motorcycle pictures." <--This is what i want to say.

'motorcycle' functions as an adjective: It tells us what kind of 'pictures. Adjectives do not take -s. Nouns do:

I have three motorcycles. (Noun)
I have three motorcycle pictures. (Adjective)

All the best,




I am not sure if I've ever heard or seen using 'motorcycle' as an adjective.

IMO, it should be motorcycle(noun)+picture(noun), and if one wants to make plural, the 's' goes then to the second noun(pictures) in such case.
Let's see more examples:

e.g. a motorcycle accident (singular)
motorcycle accidents (plural)

:wink:




[/b]

It's a noun in form and an adjective in function. It tells us what kind of pictures. 'motorcycle' is not the object of the verb or the subject of the sentence. It's not functioning as a noun.

Compound nouns are good examples of nouns functioning as adjectives:

houseboat (noun+noun)
What kind of boat?
The house kind.

Hope that helps.
 

jack

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Are you still friends with her? <---correct? why? what does it mean? Why does "friends" have a "s"?
Are you still friend with her? <---correct? why? what does it mean?
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Are you still friends with her? <---correct? why? what does it mean? Why does "friends" have a "s"?
Are you still friend with her? <---correct? why? what does it mean?

'friends' refers to 'you' and 'her'. You could also say,

Are you (two) still friends?
Are (the two of) you still friends?

All the best,
 

jack

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"Hey, did you know farmers like animals?" <--correct? what does it mean?
"Hey, did you know farmer likes animals?" <--correct? what does it mean?

one farmer like many animals. <--how do i say this in my format?
eg.
"Hey, did you know farmer likes animals?" <--correct?


one farmer like one animal. <--how do i say this in my format?
eg.
"Hey, did you know farmer likes animal?" <--correct?
or
"Hey, did you know farmer likes a animal?" <--correct?
or
"Hey, did you know farmer likes one animal?" <--correct?
 

Casiopea

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If the person or animal is specific, one, then make the nouns specific by stating who and what kind of animal. If the people or animals are general, then make the nouns general by adding -s:

1. Hey, did you know farmers like animals? :D
==> Farmers in general like animals.

2. Hey, did you know farmer likes animals? :(
==> that farmer over there likes animals/ Bob the farmer likes animals/ the farmer down the road likes animals/ etc.

3. Hey, did you know farmer likes animal? :(
==> that farmer over there likes cows.

All the best,
 
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