adding -s

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jack

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Are these correct? If not, why? What's the different in meaing between them?

1. TV on the desktop is a great feature and the Leadtek will definitely be getting a lot of use.

2. TV on the desktop is a great feature and the Leadtek will definitely be getting a lot of uses.
 

Tdol

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Use 1- the uncoiuntable 'use'means that the single feature will be used a lot. The plural would mean that it had different applications.

PS 'What's the difference in meaning between them?'
;-)
 

jack

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Thanks.

What's the difference in meaing between these two? Please correct them if they are incorrect.
1. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggressions?
2. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggression?

3. That's it, no more houseguest.
4. That's it, no more houseguests.

5. There is so much light over there.
6. There are so much lights over there.

I don't understand these. What do they mean?
7. They weren't your average types.
8. They weren't your average type.
9. When you come to a situation like this...
10. When you come to situations like this....
11. I need some books with lots of dialog.
12 I need some books with lots of dialogs.

13. And a lot of this info can be found in your garbage, or even in your conversation.
This was taken from here:
http://finance.sympatico.msn.ca/content/savingsdebt/savingsdebthome/P30111.asp

I don't get why 'conversation' is not 'conversations'? What's the difference?


14. Look for a shredder that “cross-cuts”.
This was taken from here:
http://finance.sympatico.msn.ca/content/savingsdebt/savingsdebthome/P30111.asp

Does "cut" have to be "cuts"? If so, why? If not, what does "cross cut" mean?

Are these correct?
15. He lets him
16. He let him.
 

jack

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Can someone please help me with the post above? I really don't understand this. I don't understand when to add -s. Can someone please explain this to me. I am waiting desperately for a reply. Thanks in advance.
 

A.Russell

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jack said:
Can someone please help me with the post above? I really don't understand this. I don't understand when to add -s. Can someone please explain this to me. I am waiting desperately for a reply. Thanks in advance.


That was quite a long list. I won't gothrough all of them, but it is fairly straightforward. The plural s can be used for things in general, as in "I like dogs." Most obviously, it is also used when there is more than one of whatever ("the machine has several uses"). You've also given an example of the 3rd person singular s on verbs: "The machine cross-cuts," as an intransitive of "The machine cuts across something."
 

jack

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Thank you very much.

I still desperately need help with these. I really don't understand the difference in meaning between these:

What's the difference in meaing between these two? Please correct them if they are incorrect.
1. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggressions?
2. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggression?

3. That's it, no more houseguest.
4. That's it, no more houseguests.

5. There is so much light over there.
6. There are so much lights over there.

I don't understand these. What do they mean?
7. They weren't your average types.
8. They weren't your average type.
9. When you come to a situation like this...
10. When you come to situations like this....
11. I need some books with lots of dialog.
12 I need some books with lots of dialogs.
 

Casiopea

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1. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggression? (More than one kind of aggression :?:
2. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggression? :D
3. That's it, no more houseguest. :D (One guest)
4. That's it, no more houseguests. :D (All guests)
5. There is so much light over there. :D (Non-count; energy)
6. There are so many lights over there. :D (Count; things)
7. They weren't your average types. :?: (Many types)
8. They weren't your average type. :D (One type)
9. When you come to a situation like this one... :D
10. When you come to situations like this one/these ones... :D
11. I need some books with lots of dialogue. :D (dialogue in general)
12 I need some books with lots of dialogues. :D (More than one kind of dialogue)

Spelling: dialogue :wink:
 

A.Russell

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[quote="jack"1. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggressions?
2. Can you find some other place to deal with your aggression? [/quote]

Some nouns don't like to take a plural form. A couple of examles are fish and sheep. I have a feeling there may be a "rule" regarding nouns made from adjectives like aggression, happyness, that they can't take plural form ether. I don't have a dictionary nearby, but please check.

3. That's it, no more houseguest.
4. That's it, no more houseguests.

guests are countable


5. There is so much light over there.
6. There are so much lights over there.

In the sense you have written this, light is uncountable. If you meant light as in a light fitting, that would be countable: "there are so many lights over there."

7. They weren't your average types.
8. They weren't your average type.

The first one suggests more than one type.

9. When you come to a situation like this...
10. When you come to situations like this....

Semantically I can see no difference.

11. I need some books with lots of dialog.
12 I need some books with lots of dialogs.

This depends on whether you are thinking about dialogue as a countable or uncountable thing. It could be either.


That was all just off the top of my head. Hope it helps.



I think if you study up on countable/uncountable you will understand better.

EDIT> Nevermind, while I was eating my pizza, Casi beat me to it.
 

jack

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I think if you study up on countable/uncountable you will understand better

Thanks.
Can you name me a few titles for these 'countable/uncountable' books? Do I just go to the library and look for a grammer book or specifically 'countable/uncountable' book?
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Are these correct? What do they mean?

1. Don't get your hopes up.
2. Don't get your hope up.


1. is correct. 'get your hopes up' is a set phrase. 'hopes' refers to expectations.

All the best, :D
 

jack

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1. is correct. 'get your hopes up' is a set phrase. 'hopes' refers to expectations.

I still don't get the explanation for this. Can you explain this in another way or make it more thorough? Thanks.

I sitll don't get why this is wrong:

1. Don't get your hope up. (The sentence is grammatically correct?)
2. Don't get your expectation up. (Correct? Why can't I do it for 'hope'?)
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
1. is correct. 'get your hopes up' is a set phrase. 'hopes' refers to expectations.

I still don't get the explanation for this. Can you explain this in another way or make it more thorough? Thanks.

I sitll don't get why this is wrong:

1. Don't get your hope up. (The sentence is grammatically correct?)
2. Don't get your expectation up. (Correct? Why can't I do it for 'hope'?)

My hope/wish is that something will happen in my favor. I have one hope/wish, but when I talk about raising/lifting up my hopes (i.e., expecting a positive result/expecting thesituation to go my way/to go in my favor), I use the plural form "hopes". The reason being, I don't really know. :oops: That's why it's a set phrase, I guess.
 

jack

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Are these correct? If not, why?

1. It makes me feel resentment toward it.
2. It makes me feel resentment towards it

3. Stop screamimg on top of your lungs. (why is 'lung' plural?)
3. Stop screamimg on top of your lung.
 

A.Russell

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jack said:
Are these correct? If not, why?

1. It makes me feel resentment toward it.
2. It makes me feel resentment towards it

3. Stop screamimg on top of your lungs. (why is 'lung' plural?)
3. Stop screamimg on top of your lung.


And I thought yo said you'd got it.

Think about this: How many lungs do you have?

The first one, I don't think it makes any difference. It's also not a noun, and so a little different to the rest of your questions.
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Are these correct? If not, why?

1. It makes me feel resentment toward it.
2. It makes me feel resentment towards it

3. Stop screamimg on top of your lungs. (why is 'lung' plural?)
4. Stop screamimg on top of your lung.

toward (AmE) and towards (BrE)are interchangeable. :wink:

4. is fine if the person has one lung. :shock: If not, it's odd. It's like saying, "Stop counting on that one finger." :lol:

All the best, :D
 
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