adverb of place

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navi tasan

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Which of these is correct:
1-I have never gone to the Sunshine restaurant, on fourth avenue.
2-Somebody stole his money, in his safe. (meaning "his money, which was in his safe". I always say "FROM his safe", but I wanted to know if "in" is necessarily wrong here.)
3-The best restaurant in town is the Sunshine retaurant, on fourth avenue.
 

RonBee

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For sentence two, for the sake of clarity it is best that you use the "which" clause. If you use "from" you don't need the comma. The other two are perfectly fine.
 

navi tasan

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Thanks RonBee.
Another question, related to the first one:
1-I went to Joe's Café on Fifth Avenue.
2-I went to Joe's, on Fifth Avenue.
Does the comma really change anything here?

(I delibrately did not use "the Sunshine restaurent" because "the Sunshine restaurant on Fifth Avenue" might mean that there are a few "Sunshine restaurants" in town (it is a chain thing) and I went to the one on Fifth Avenue).
 

RonBee

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navi tasan said:
Thanks RonBee.
Another question, related to the first one:
1-I went to Joe's Café on Fifth Avenue.
2-I went to Joe's, on Fifth Avenue.
Does the comma really change anything here?

The first sentence seems to imply that there is more than one Joe's Cafe, which is certainly a possibliity. The second sentence leaves no room for doubt.

navi tasan said:
(I delibrately did not use "the Sunshine restaurent" because "the Sunshine restaurant on Fifth Avenue" might mean that there are a few "Sunshine restaurants" in town (it is a chain thing) and I went to the one on Fifth Avenue).

That is, I think, the usual form such a statement would take. There are several establishments in St. Louis called The Bread Company. If I would refer to The Bread Company on Grand Avenue people would know I am talking about that particular restaurant/deli. Otherwise, they might not know which one I am talking about.
 

navi tasan

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I thought about this some more and as usual started to have doubts.
In order for it to become a defining clause (we are not using the comma), shouldn't one use "the"?

A1-"I went to the Joe's Café on Fifth Avenue." (Not the one on Tenth Avenue.)
We don't have this problem with RonBee's example (The Bread Company)because there already is a "the" in the name of the place.
 

RonBee

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navi tasan said:
I thought about this some more and as usual started to have doubts.
In order for it to become a defining clause (we are not using the comma), shouldn't one use "the"?

A1-"I went to the Joe's Café on Fifth Avenue." (Not the one on Tenth Avenue.)
We don't have this problem with RonBee's example (The Bread Company)because there already is a "the" in the name of the place.

In this case, we are not talking about a clause at all.

A Clause is a part of a sentence that usually contains a Subject and a Verb. It is usually connected [to] the other part of the Sentence by a Conjunction. It is not a complete sentence on its own.
https://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/clause.html

However, using the definite article (the) makes things clearer. If I refer to the McDonald's on South Grand it makes it clear I am talking about that particular restaurant. In fact, you can't not use the the in that case. Now, you could just say "I am going to McDonald's" and the person you are talking to may or may not know which one you are talking about.

HTH

:)
 

Lib

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1-I have never gone to the Sunshine restaurant, on fourth avenue.

What about:
I have never been to the Sunshine restaurant?
 

Tdol

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I must say 'been' sounds better in BE. ;-)
 
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